PPL Books + Medical Questions

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Lamprocles
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PPL Books + Medical Questions

Post by Lamprocles » Tue Feb 19, 2013 1:58 am

I'm sure these questions have been asked before but I became concerned with some of the dates of some posts, some of which were several years ago and I was hoping for an up-to-date reply hence this thread.

I've recently decided I'd like to (finally) start and complete my PPL. However, due to financial considerations, I'll have to start next year, 2014, and hope to complete my Ground Exams first, knowing that they will expire within 2 years should I not complete my final examination in the sky.

I was googling around for resources to use for these examinations and came across several, but most people seemed to recommend the Trevor Thom books. Specifically, I was looking at them on Amazon and several people noted that some aspects were out of date, most notably in Aviation Law given that the books were published in 2001. I was wondering is this a difficulty or can I go ahead and get the books anyway? Is there anything else I need to study apart from all the books mentioned by Trevor Thom on Amazon?

http://www.amazon.co.uk/s/ref=nb_sb_nos ... revor+thom" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;

Also, for a PPL, I noticed that the top medical examination costs up to 700 euro, which I discovered in the other thread, but I guess I don't need this version of the medical for a PPL, paying 700E for a certificate to say that I'm fine seems very high indeed! I'm also guessing I'll have to emigrate to the US for a few weeks given how cheaper they are for a PPL. I emailed the National Flight Centre to find out how much it costs for them but I very much doubt it will even compare to the price that the US version is.

Thanks in advance for any replies! :)

Rev
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Re: PPL Books + Medical Questions

Post by Rev » Tue Feb 19, 2013 11:39 pm

Hi Lamprocles!

Best of luck and welcome to the world of flying, you'll do just fine no doubt! :)

First things first, why don't you join a club and speak with the CFI/ Instructors etc.
Some clubs might even run their own ground school, they will have "new PPL graduates" who can tell you what you will need to do/get.

As far as the medical, I wasn't aware that it costs that much, normally a Class-II medical (for PPL) is about 150euro, or maybe someone can correct me if i'm mistaken if it's your initial medical?

Just give any of the doctors a call from this IAA site and you'll find out:
https://www.iaa.ie/ames (click on "view all locations" at the bottom)

Just get a bit of flying done first, even half hour a month or every two months, just to meet people and keep things moving along. Don't try to do it all on your own from books alone!

all the best!

Lamprocles
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Re: PPL Books + Medical Questions

Post by Lamprocles » Thu Feb 21, 2013 10:38 pm

Rev wrote:Hi Lamprocles!

Best of luck and welcome to the world of flying, you'll do just fine no doubt! :)

First things first, why don't you join a club and speak with the CFI/ Instructors etc.
Some clubs might even run their own ground school, they will have "new PPL graduates" who can tell you what you will need to do/get.

As far as the medical, I wasn't aware that it costs that much, normally a Class-II medical (for PPL) is about 150euro, or maybe someone can correct me if i'm mistaken if it's your initial medical?

Just give any of the doctors a call from this IAA site and you'll find out:
https://www.iaa.ie/ames (click on "view all locations" at the bottom)

Just get a bit of flying done first, even half hour a month or every two months, just to meet people and keep things moving along. Don't try to do it all on your own from books alone!

all the best!
Hi Rev, I appreciate the reply, the only one! :-)

I think I got confused between the Class I medical which costs around 700 euro and the Class II medical which may be 150-200 euro as you suggested. I'm aware I need a Class II for a PPL and a Class I for commercial flights, I was terribly worried I'd have to fork out 700 quid which at the moment I just cannot do! :-P

I guess I have this nagging concern that something will go horribly wrong when I'm told I'm good enough to do a solo flight. I have every confidence in myself and I have every interest in flying, just what concerns me is that these types of plane crash relatively regularly with experienced pilots. If experienced pilots can crash unexpectedly, then why should I be confident in my beginning ability to complete a solo flight without the aid of an instructor? Obviously, this may seem fallacious because experienced drivers of cars crash all the time but there's something about being suspended in air which creates a greater sense of vulnerability than driving in a car on the comfort of the ground.

wolfie
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Re: PPL Books + Medical Questions

Post by wolfie » Sat Feb 23, 2013 12:12 am

Hi Lamprocles

Fair play for taking the plunge with the PPL, you won't regret it :)

The Trevor Thom books are fairly standard for PPL flight training (Book 1) and theory (the rest, although you probably won't want Instrument Flying for now). In terms of the Air Law, it's been a good while since I did that exam, but if you get the Trevor Thom Air Law book and "Irish Aviation Law for Pilots" by John Swan, you'll be sorted. Some of the Trevor Thom book may be out of date, but that's probably UK stuff, the more general stuff is probably grand. The John Swan book is a good concise Air Law manual, definitely worth getting. Depending on where you train, they may use different books, so you're probably best not to get them just yet. (The John Swan book is the one that you definitely will get though.)

Rev is right about getting some flight time (say maybe 4 or 5 hours). When you do something practically, it's a lot easier to link the theory to it for the exams.

Sounds like you've thought about your timeframe to get this done, that's essential, gives you something to focus the mind on. Just remember, with aviation nothing runs to schedule - weather, life, aircraft going tech etc - all get in the way and and slow up flight training. So that might make you think about the time you're giving yourself to get this all done while still being within validity of the exams. Bad idea to be burning down the line towards the end of those exams while trying to sort out getting ready for a flight test. One option might be to fly until you finish the 5 hours of circuits, do the exams, and then go back to start the navigation side of things. You'll have a good idea of how the plane works, and a bit of law and met.

Regarding flight training, try to have as much cash put aside for it as you can, so that money doesn't become an issue. Most people (99%) don't get the license in 45 hours, so budgeting, or be able to bring in money for up to 80 - 90 hours is a good idea. That might sound extreme, but for a part-time PPL, it's about normal. Don't ever let money stop you, just work out a budget and go for it. Saying that, you might be Chuck Yeager and 45 hours will be too much :)

Last thing about the concern of something going horribly wrong

1) That concern will keep you alive. Full stop. Don't dwell on it, just use it to make you a safe pilot. People who think they're Chuck Yeager aren't, will miss something someday, and if they're lucky get away with it...

2) Instructors only let students go solo when they know the student is ready. First solo is legend, never to be forgotten.

Lastly, like Rev says, go talk to pilots. Don't believe everything flying schools, clubs say, listen to everyone and make up your own mind.

Best of luck with it

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