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Posted: Thu Mar 19, 2009 7:51 pm
by buggyB
Unfortunately I don't have much in the way of photos with an Irish link, but this may do.
Can anyone name the type and/or application
Image

And no, that's not my hanger :)

Posted: Thu Mar 19, 2009 8:04 pm
by Flyer1
Is it by any chance an Focke Achgelis Fa 330 ? If i'm right on the type, they can be folded up and kept in a tube which was carried by u-boats underwater. I remember my Grandad telling me about these. He said he saw one at an RAF museum.

Posted: Thu Mar 19, 2009 10:37 pm
by Papa8
The Begorrah-Copter piloted by leprechauns. :lol: :wink:

Posted: Thu Mar 19, 2009 10:49 pm
by buggyB
That's it alright-er..the Fa330, not the leprechaun one :) Scary looking contraption, almost as scary as EI-DZO :wink:

They were towed behind the U-boat to get a high vantage point for the lookout. Reovery of the aircraft and stowage took about 20min so in the event of an aircraft happening on them the gyro and pilot were considered expendable-the tether was simply cut and the U-Boat submerged. Not a lot of volunteers for that job.

That particular one is on display in RAF Cosford.

Posted: Thu Mar 19, 2009 10:51 pm
by Papa8
Taking a wild guess, don't think any radar existed in Ireland in WWII so perhaps it was a cheap simple reconnaisance vehicle to investigate invasion opportunities through Ireland to the UK?

EDIT: Too late. Anyway forgot the Germans didn't really know much about Britain's radar anyway so why use it in the way I have suggested.

Oh and believe it or not but Japan had a sub that could hold three full-size foldable airplanes.

Posted: Thu Mar 19, 2009 11:22 pm
by hugoj_air
I took this shot of the Wren 182 at Gatwick 06.1969. It crashed at
Edenderry on 16.05.1980. I seen the remaining fuselage section at Abbeyshrule 12.09.1987.

Image

Hugo.

Posted: Fri Mar 20, 2009 3:09 pm
by Tony Kearns
Image

Name the Airfield in the picture, should be no problem for Hugo.

Posted: Fri Mar 20, 2009 3:16 pm
by Papa8
Hi Tony,

Looks like the layout the RAF made for Collinstown.

Posted: Fri Mar 20, 2009 5:01 pm
by Tony Kearns
Papa8 wrote:Hi Tony,

Looks like the layout the RAF made for Collinstown.


'Fraid not Papa8 but that was a good guess, the date was 1941, that might push it on!
Tony K

Posted: Fri Mar 20, 2009 8:14 pm
by Papa8
Tony, Tony evil, evil Tony,

From the internet it seems at least SEVEN airfields in Northern Ireland opened or began operations in 1941.

Kirkistown seems my best shot of the seven.

The other possible six are: Ballyhalbert, Long Kesh, Eglinton, St Angelo, Sydenham and Limavady.

Posted: Fri Mar 20, 2009 9:11 pm
by Tony Kearns
Image

Sorry Papa8 not NI, might as well hand it on a plate to you.
Tony K

Posted: Fri Mar 20, 2009 9:52 pm
by Xacto
Tony, you have to leave your photos on the photobucket site for them to appear here. If you rename, delete or replace them in photobucket then they will disappear from this site.

I didn’t see your first picture so I’ll take a wild stab based on the second one.

Gormanston??

Xacto.

Posted: Fri Mar 20, 2009 10:27 pm
by Papa8
Bit of searching and you are right, Xacto. I never knew about this use of the aerodrome. This must be the construction of the internment camp at the aerodrome.

Posted: Fri Mar 20, 2009 11:16 pm
by Tony Kearns
Yes Gormansburgh is correct.
My apologies Xacto didn't realise that it would be deleted, thought that I had to delete prior to uploading the next picture. Still on a learning curve.
The picture was taken during annual camp, the white objects in front of the hangars are bell tents. The internment camp was not constructed until early 1944 and even then only housed a small number of Allied Internees prior to release as by that time all Allied Internees were gone from the Curragh. Only the Germans remained.
Tony K

Posted: Fri Mar 20, 2009 11:18 pm
by hugoj_air
Tony Kearns wrote:Image

Name the Airfield in the picture, should be no problem for Hugo.


Nice of you to say so Tony, but I missed the photo. Or was it the Gormanston photo, If it was, then yes I would have recognised it.

Hugo.