Low & Slow

Here's a section for all our rotorheads, both helis and gyros!

Moderator: mark

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mini
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Low & Slow

Post by mini » Sat Sep 29, 2007 12:19 am

I guess a lot of the helo ops carried out here are in this high risk cat.

What do you guys think about this?

Flyiing in the grey zone is not fun. What precautions do you take?

stovepipe
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Post by stovepipe » Mon Oct 01, 2007 2:48 pm

Hi mini
First precaution: never admit to doing anything reckless/stupid/illegal on a public forum.Second: when you are out in poor weather, never look up as a helicopter will surely appear and you will be forced to witness scud-running.Third: a fixed-wing pilot's attitude to this kind of flying differs from that of a rotary pilot,especially a rotary pilot under, ahem, commercial pressure.
regards
Stovepipe

Bladecrack
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Post by Bladecrack » Thu Oct 04, 2007 6:25 pm

Stovepipe,

Are you seriously trying to say FW aircraft never go scud running and never have any commercial pressure to deal with? I have seen FW aircraft flying very low on occasion, when weather was not a factor, and I mean well below 500 agl....

BC

stovepipe
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Post by stovepipe » Sun Oct 07, 2007 1:40 am

Hi there
Sure they do, but the number of small commercial FW aircraft in Ireland is significantly outnumbered by the number of small and not-very-small helicopters operating commercially and the FW aircraft tend not to land outside airports.I have heard from several experienced heli pilots that they come under fierce pressure to complete journeys, from people who have no clue about met conditions, in very legal/safety-dubious met/viz conditions.
regards
S

mini
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Post by mini » Tue Oct 09, 2007 11:55 pm

Stovepipe,

This is my concern, given our national "attitude" ah sure we'll be alright...

Are we more susceptible to jobs in this area?

What to do?

Bladecrack
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Post by Bladecrack » Thu Oct 11, 2007 12:09 am

Mini,

Most of it is common sense, minimise the risks by doing the following;

1. Plan all flights properly and do not rush.
2. If you don't know something, dont blunder on and hope for the best, find out from someone who will know.
3. Understand MET, and make sure and get all relevant MET info, including possible diversions.
4. Do a proper walkround, fuel and C of G calculation.
5. Check NOTAMS, & use up to date charts etc.
6. Listen to experienced pilots, learn from their mistakes so that you do not make the same ones.
7. Brief passengers & crew properly and use the right safety equipment.
8. Do a CRM course, know your limits and do not exceed them.
9. Stay current on type and practice emergencies regularly with an instructor.
10. Use technology, computers for example, programmes that can show you earth mapping and grid co-ordinates, aerial photos etc, for landing sites.
11. Know how to navigate with a chart, do NOT rely on a GPS, they can fail, it happened to me.
12. Keep your licence & medical current and check the aircraft docs before flight.

This list gives you an idea on what to think of, but there are more than this, a popular way to remember important things to check is M.A.T.E.

M = MET, comprehensive and up to date.
A = AIRCRAFT, docs in date, defects, performance, and fuel.
T = TIME, endurance, daylight, airfield operating hours and planning time.
E = EXERCISE = flight plans, notams, PPR, route.

Remember, you are the aircraft captain, you make the decisions, not the passengers, it doesn't matter how wealthy they are, you can't spend money if you are dead!

Regards,
BC

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