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Posted: Fri Jul 15, 2005 8:56 pm
by JFH
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Posted: Fri Jul 15, 2005 10:24 pm
by Bob
It's something like 1500 for about 5-6 places.

Not sure on the second question but i would say you've to do a huge amount.

Posted: Sat Jul 16, 2005 12:32 am
by shrtfld
I met a couple of Aer Corps pilots last year. They come through Coonagh from time to time flying the FR172's on Nav exercises. As I recall it seems all they get from the IAA is the PPL. They seem however to be facilitated in doing the CPL writtens.

Maybe one or two of the Aer Corps pilots tune in here. They might confim my understanding of the situation.

Posted: Sat Jul 16, 2005 2:06 am
by buzz
Air Corps pilots have to go through the same JAA exams and tests as the rest of us if they want a civilian licence when they leave. The Aer Corps is not a JAA approved training organisation. Most do while in service in preparation for the big day when they leave to join Ryanair or whoever. Of course Ryanair makes you pay to join them as well. .

Posted: Fri Aug 19, 2005 11:38 pm
by Joey D
Bob wrote:It's something like 1500 for about 5-6 places.

Not sure on the second question but i would say you've to do a huge amount.


Its more like 350 applicants for the Air Corps, its over a thousand for all the cadetships (Army, Navy and IAC)

Posted: Sat Aug 20, 2005 1:06 am
by ei6265
Thousands do apply for the Air Corps, and last year there were only 6 available places. :cry:

Why is it so hard to become a pilot nowadays? :cry: :cry:

Posted: Sat Aug 20, 2005 2:45 pm
by Joey D
ei6265 wrote:Thousands do apply for the Air Corps, and last year there were only 6 available places. :cry:

Why is it so hard to become a pilot nowadays? :cry: :cry:


Thousands do not apply for the Air Corps. In 2003 1,111 applied to all the cadetships (Army, Navy and AC) with 71 cadets accepted, in 2002 1,047 people applied to become a cadet (Army, Navy and AC) and, again 71 were accepted. This 71 was broken down into Army, Navy and AC. In 2004 the intake was ten cadets to the Naval Service, 51 cadets to the Army and six cadets to the Air Corps totaling 67 with 916 applying to all cadetships.

Lets not frighen any potential applicants away by saying thousands apply when in fact its between 300-400 for the Air Corps.

Posted: Sat Aug 20, 2005 3:31 pm
by ei6265
Ah, thanks for clearing that up. :)

Posted: Sat Aug 20, 2005 7:35 pm
by Dutch Roll
ei6265 wrote:Why is it so hard to become a pilot nowadays? :cry: :cry:


is not so much with becoming a pilot,its competency in a number of strenghts/areas.you have to be smart thinking,a leader etc. in fact those areas of strength what they look for are in the brochures they send out.

Posted: Mon Aug 22, 2005 11:17 pm
by Eddie Dillon
This year again the number was something like 350 applicants to Air Corps with (apparantly) 6 being offered places today.

Posted: Thu Aug 25, 2005 12:41 pm
by Joey D
Eddie Dillon wrote:This year again the number was something like 350 applicants to Air Corps with (apparantly) 6 being offered places today.


Ten places were offered this year

Posted: Thu Aug 25, 2005 1:01 pm
by -Al-
does anyone know what the average hours you leave the air corps with are? I know theres kinda a joke about the low-time air corps guys.

Posted: Thu Aug 25, 2005 1:53 pm
by Davey
Does anyone know for sure what the upper age limit for the A.C. is??
There seems to be a bit of confusion with it,some sites say one age another site says different..
Cheers,
DAVE............

Posted: Thu Aug 25, 2005 2:03 pm
by Dutch Roll
its 23 i think and 28 if you have a degree
www.military.ie/

Posted: Fri Aug 26, 2005 12:11 am
by Joey D
Dutch Roll wrote:its 23 i think and 28 if you have a degree
www.military.ie/


According to this years brochure (competitions '05) they changed the with/without degree age, its now

1(c): "Be not less than 17 years of age and under 28 years of age on 1 October, in the competition year."