Flying on an expired SEP Rating

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Flying on an expired SEP Rating

Post by mark »

Hi all,

I was asked an interesting question recently and was wondering if anybody here knows the answer. As you know, you need a SEP rating on your PPL, CPL, ATPL to fly a single engined aircraft. This lasts for 2 years and in the second year you need the usual 1 hour with and instructor, 12 hours, 12 landings etc. etc.

However under the new EASA LAPL there is a rolling 24 month validity instead of a fixed 2 year period as is on the other EASA licences. Since the privileges of a LAPL are automatically embedded in a higher category of EASA licence, does this mean that you can fly with an expired SEP rating provided you have met the 24 month rolling validity required for the LAPL? I guess this is an unintended consequence of Part FCL but it throws up an interesting situation.

Any ideas?

Regards,
Mark
Regards,
Mark Dwyer
www.flyinginireland.com

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lookout
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Re: Flying on an expired SEP Rating

Post by lookout »

Hi Mark

One of many interesting questions arising from the introduction of the EASA LAPL.

From what I understand the LAPL is not a subset of the ICAO compliant EASA PART-FCL -PPL (what a mouthful) but rather is a European wide license encompassing a subset of the Full PPPL privileges.
As such it is a standalone license.

So in order to avail of the LAPL's 24 month rolling validity you actually need to have separate LAPL License either by obtaining a separate license alongside your PPL or by converting (downgrading) your PPL to a LAPL. Either way it means enriching the coffers of the IAA or CAA.

Slight caution however in that It is possible that in the small print of the conversion rules that your PPL needs to be valid in order to obtain the LAPL conversion, but this would be a matter for the respective aviation authority and whether or not they insist on checking your log book

Paperwork aside once you are on the LAPL system you are thereafter restricted by its limitations and will have to undergo a full flight test plus other possible extras (exams / in school study / cross-country / IFR training) - depending on how much time your PPL has elapsed - in-order to regain the PPL, should you ever wish to do so.

If you only wish to fly VFR in Europe in a four seater aircraft with a Mtow less than 2000kg (which for the most part covers the majority of Irish GA pilots) the the LAPL is the obvious way to go.

If however you might ever aspire to obtaining a CPL, or wish to fly IFR or to fly in the USA then its better to comply with the extra requirements of the PPL and keep your options open.

regards

lookout

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Re: Flying on an expired SEP Rating

Post by mark »

Hi lookout,

Thanks for the comprehensive reply, I had a discussion with a CAA Examiner yesterday evening and he basically said the same.

If you think this stuff is complicated here, try looking across to the UK, they have so many different types of PPL's, NPPL's, Lifetime PPL's etc. that they're really struggling. Then throw the IMC or IR(R) into the equation and it becomes almost impossible to understand!

Regards,
Mark
Regards,
Mark Dwyer
www.flyinginireland.com

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