Student Money-Saving Tips

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Papa8
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Student Money-Saving Tips

Post by Papa8 »

I thought why not see what tips people out there have that they employ to keep the cost of our private flying down. If we can share this information widely it might help a lot of people. They can be any less than obvious money-saving tips that are safe however a suggestion like 'fly microlights, paramotors, go abroad to learn is obviously a cheaper situation and not really the 'tips' I am thinking of in this post.

For my two cents:

I take turns driving with another local pilot to attend ground school classes (nearly one hour to our club) and perhaps if you know a pilot near your house then it may work out to either book slots for the same time (if your place has multiple aircraft/instructors or multiple clubs). This also lends itself to sharing other things such as books, software, hangar talk etc that can keep cost down. The fuel/wear and tear savings by sharing a car with another pilot in my case saves me around €15 everytime. Sharing books/software during learning saves money also of course.

I will also look, when possible, to book an instructor for a double slot as I feel I progress more from the sum of the two lessons together than from them individually and I save on the extra individual trips to the airfield. Booking during the week (something I can't take advantage of at the moment) also allows for greater frequency of flying as bookings are fewer and allows a booking to be selected somewhat based on favourable forecast weather if making a booking only a few days ahead.

Anyone else got ideas that are worth sharing? I am sure students going abroad to learn to fly share accommodation/living costs but what about other ideas?
It only takes two things to fly:--- airspeed and money.

Nanolight
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Post by Nanolight »

It what works out for you personally I suppose, so I would suggest that every student has a think about what works for them

I find that a 15 minute chat and 45-55 minutes in the air worked best for me. I can give the lesson my full attention for about 50 minutes, but after that my mind starts wandering and any training I do is not really worthwhile.

I would suggest that if someone is going to consider taking up flying, that they put aside enough money to do a good spate of lessons... maybe 2 grand, before they start. This way they can fly regularly, which means they stay in practice. Staying in practice cuts the amount of flying time overall because you are constantly fresh, and don't waste 15 or 20 minutes a lesson getting back into it.

I also suggest you study what you will be learning in your training at home before you go flying. This means that when the instructor explains a theory to you, such as secondary effects of controls or adverse yaw or whatever, you already know what he is talking about and don't waste 10 minutes flying time trying to grasp it. You'll progress through your course quicker this way and save money.

If your instructor is amenable to the idea, sit in on other people's briefs, even if they are at a different stage. Something will sink in.

Youtube is great for looking at spins and stalls and different attitudes and what to expect from flying. Borrowing books or buying them second hand as opposed to from the club is great and many clubs give you print-off notes which work just fine.
Smoke me a kipper, I'll be back for breakfast.

Flyer1
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Post by Flyer1 »

Great thread guys,

One tip which I have, which saved me vasts of money is to get yourself in the air with other pilots as much as possible. There are some mega experienced people flying in this country who when you got flying with them for an hour will be as valuable as 5 hours with an instructor. The more time you spend in the air, the more you see little tips and tricks, and where things can go wrong. Most pilots will gladly fill all seats available, buy them lunch or pay the landing fee, something to show your grace.

Flyer1 :)

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EiMPB
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Post by EiMPB »

I agree completely with Flyer 1! Get in the air as often as you can! Anyone flying with a spare seat will let you come along!!! I find flying with others is still very beneficial to me and it always breeds discussion after the flight when you inevitably do something differently! And if you see something you don't understand or would never do ask about it! pilots love to talk about flying, they'll yabber for hours!

Another tip I'd recommend is to stay in the smallest plane you can! I know that some people need the bigger planes like a 172, but a 152 will do for most!! it may only be €20 in the difference, but it adds up!

Oh, and if you're going to CPL, or intending flying regularly, buy good equipment! It lasts longer! buy David Clarke over the cheaper ones etc etc.. My grandad once told me that he was "too poor to buy cheap" and it stuck with me ever since! Not having to constantly replace things is a great way to save money!

Just my thoughts anyway!

MPB.

stovepipe
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Post by stovepipe »

Hi there
I agree wholeheartedly about getting spare seats in other people's aircraft, but be prepared to pay for fuel or exchange labour for flight time.It's good manners to make the offer before people have to ask.Quite often, all you'll have to do is help open hangar doors and push out the aircraft......Also, don't log anything you are not legally entitled to.Also, the downside of getting to fly with a wedge of different pilots is that you'll get a whole lot of different opinions about how to carry out, for example, a PFL or how to start a hot engine.You'll have to develop a mental filter to sort out good gen from false gen, especially if you are still learning from one instructor.Don't undermine his teaching by incorporating someone else's information.
regards
Stovepipe

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libertyxl2flyer
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Post by libertyxl2flyer »

great thread guys as a fairly low hour ppl i would strongly recommend anybody to get there bum on an empty seat one thing i have learned since i got my ppl anybody who can help will. and i think not enogh credit goes to things like good forums like this one which can give great flying advice and is a great platform to meet wit other flyers. once u do wat was said earlyer try block out the sh** some people can say including me !
n550xl make left traffic report midfield downwind cleard for takeoff runway 08

sinekura
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spare on time building

Post by sinekura »

Another good way to spend money, especially to those who build hours to ATPL is to find the flight training school with lower rates. One that I've used were www.avioservice.eu.
They provide a new Tecnam P92-JS for only 75GBP per hr (fuel, insurances, airfield fees are incl).
Acommodations, Ryanair flight to Riga are cheap.

If any other possibilities of inexpensive flights - please post.

inverted
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Post by inverted »

In these challenging times is there anyone else here thinks it might be time to resurrect the post “seats available” ? Buy fuel / lunch / pints etc…

Flyer1
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Post by Flyer1 »

Thats a great idea inverted.

If anyone is looking to build hours cheaply have a look at Waterford Aero Club. Without a doubt the cheapest Group A rental in the country.

Two brand new Tecnam P2002-JF's, one very clean PA28-161, excellent availability, best flying location in the country.

Below are a rough guide to solo price rates.

Tecnams are €125/tacho hour which works out around €85 per clock hour.

PA28 is €172/tacho hour which works out around €120 per clock hour.

No need to travel abroad ! Saving even more in flights, accommodation.

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