Ultraflight
  • damienair
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    by damienair » Thu Nov 08, 2007 6:29 pm

    Hello Whiskey Section,
    If you are going down the Microlight route, also think about Kernan Aviation, just outside Newry in Co. Armagh. They train on C42's and it is an excellent place to learn. With the new motorway, it's an easy trip of 1 hour 30 mins max from Dublin. You also will have to do less hours as they do the CAA NPPL(M), I have my licence two years now and had no problems getting my licence validated with the IAA. Once all the T's are crossed and the I's dotted and you are legal.I now have a Skyranger based in Granard, not far from Abbeyshrule. I have also flown into Birr and Kilkenny and found both training centres to be very friendly and very welcoming.
    Whatever your decision, in your in for an amazing experience.

    Damien.
    Pegasus XL 462
    PILOTS are just PLANE people with a special AIR about them
  • seamus
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    by seamus » Fri Nov 09, 2007 12:36 pm

    I also went up north and got my PPL (M) up in Kernan flying club.
    Great place to fly less hours needed for your NPPL that in the south.

    Sterling to Euro rate is not too bad at the moment.

    Shey,
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  • jonkil
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    by jonkil » Fri Nov 09, 2007 9:14 pm

    Likewise to Damien & Seamus....
    did my licence up in Kernan Valley... a wonderful friendly club that has the only agenda of learning you to fly safely and obtaining the licence. As Damien and seamus stated, less hours for the NPPL(M) and validation in the south without an issue... also have great availability in the C42's they use to train.... can't rate the school or the instructors highly enough.
    Visit their website at http://www.kernanaviation.co.uk or give Raphael a call on 00447711841492.
    I liked it so much that I remain a member of the Flying club up there just to be part of it..... there is a wonderful friendly atmosphere should you wish to fly-in anytime to visit... and when you learn to fly into "36 top field" then you will be fit for most strips !
  • willo
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    by willo » Fri Nov 09, 2007 10:14 pm

    Brings into focus the paradox of the licensing system

    Irish Aerosports/Ultraflight etc (the latter i delclare have been involved with) have to deal with IAA licensing & yet the IAA will license the training with Kernan.

    Am in no way knocking Kernans, fair f**cks to them, but accepting the NPPL by the IAA diminishes the activities south of the border,

    Makes it hard for the southern orgs to compete.

    The question is what is the standard acceptable. Where do NMAI stand on this. Who represents who. Why do the IAA insist on ICAO standards for RTFs south but will accept something less from outside.

    Before its said, I'm not denigrating the license north, I'm questioning the requirements south.

    Enough of my two cents

    B
  • Nanolight
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    by Nanolight » Fri Nov 09, 2007 11:20 pm

    Ah! The paradox that is the Irish PPL (M).

    What do the NMAI do anyway? I am not being a smart ass, I am genuinely interested... I don't know anything about them.
    Smoke me a kipper, I'll be back for breakfast.
  • jonkil
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    by jonkil » Sat Nov 10, 2007 6:01 pm

    I think the IAA themselves don't know what to do re: Microlight licensing.
    I was at a seminar earlier this year where licensing was discussed and was told by the IAA official "You cannot learn to fly a microlight in 25 hours" ... may be true.... but the minimum requirement is the underlying issue.. the UK nppl(m) states 25 hours minimum with a GP declared medical and no RT.... for what's it worth I think the RT is a good thing and for me the class 2 medical is also worthwhile, but why the hell would you want to effectively do a full PPL(A) south of the border to do fly a Microlight ?.. does not add up. I believe that the IAA are waiting for EASA to rule on the new RPL and implement that..... strange thing is that the European RPL is modelled very closely on the UK NPPL !!
    The NMAI I know has been very actively talking and working with the IAA on the licensing issue, but this has not bared fruit... seems that they do not recognise the need for such a licence.
    "Can't learn to fly a microlight in 25 hours" ? ... I have not heard of many pilots plummeting to their deaths in the UK because of the type of licence they hold.......... seems a brick wall is being hit with regards to the licensing issue here in the South, sad thing is that it is stifling training south of the border, maybe a school like Gerry Breen in Portugal, many French schools, the school in Malta many schools in Spain who all teach the UK NPPL(M) syllabus could be set up here?.... not sure what the implications would be, but if the BMAA in the UK approve such a school then the licence would effectively be 100% valid.... any takers?

    Jon.
  • damienair
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    by damienair » Sat Nov 10, 2007 6:33 pm

    The CAA NPPL(M) is a Microlight Licence which has been designed specifically for Microlights by the BMAA, both fixed wing and weightshift. The hours required are 25hrs of which 10 must be solo. Of course in reality it takes a little longer. 30 - 45 hours would be the norm. It is an excellent licence as it concertrates solely on microlight flying. When you are awarded with a CAA NPPL(M), you can also train on Group A aircraft for an extra 9 hours and be awarded a NPPL(A).
    I researched flying schools North and South of the boarder before begining my training. I had no interest in Group A as I found the ownership costs prohibative, and I wanted to own an Aircraft rather than hire. Therefore Microlights were for me. Again the cost of a Microlight Licence South of the boarder was more expensive, and the training was comparable to a group A licence.
    I trained with Kernan Aviation in Tandragee and was awarded with my licence after 5 months, from October to February, because of my training in Kernan I can land into the tightest of strips without any problems.
    Once awarded with the NPPL(M) from the CAA and BMAA I completed a Radio Telephony Licence and already had a Class II Medical. I then validated my UK NPPL(M) with the IAA.
    The Microlighting community is very strong in Ireland, there is no boarder, pilots both North and South meet most weekends during the summer at BBQ's and Flyins. If you are training in Ireland on Microlights, join the NMAI, it is an association which represents Microlight pilots. A bimonthly Newsletter is sent out to all members, Flyins are organised during the summer. An up to date diary can be found on the website , where all flyins for the upcoming year can be found. The NMAI also organise events, last year they organised the Island Hop which was a great success , 35 Microlights flew from Birr to the Arann Islands and back. It was an amazing day. Of course it will be happening again next year. Also next year the NMAI are organising a flyout from Ireland to the Microlight Trade Fair in Popham, in the UK. Many Microlights are already signed up for the Adventure. The NMAI also have a special insurance scheme with Onrisk which is available only to NMAI members. The NMAI are also part of the EASA discussion groups, and are working hard at a European and World level for the representation of Irish Microlight Pilots.
    So again, if you are already a Qualified Microlight Pilot, or are in the very exciting traing phase, Join the NMAI.
    Pegasus XL 462
    PILOTS are just PLANE people with a special AIR about them
  • koala119
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    by koala119 » Fri Jan 11, 2008 2:41 pm

    Hi,
    Just wondering whats the difference between the Samba XXL and XLA?
    I have to re-validate my SEP (land) rating an was thinking of going to Ultraflight to do it. How much do they charge for non members for flight instruction does anyone know, it says 110 Euro on there website but i think thats only for club members.

    What are they like to fly, i got my PPL in the Piper Warriors at OBA in 2006 but haven't flown much since but now need to re-validate the rating to keep the license valid. I was thinking of buying one(An XXL or XLA) or something similar, i like the idea of filling it with unleaded petrol an being able to remove the wings, Is it a permit to fly aircraft aswell? If it is; this would be cheaper in the long run to maintain than a CofA aircraft.

    Thanks
    Koala119
  • nevergiveup
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    by nevergiveup » Sun Jan 13, 2008 1:01 pm

    Ultraflight's current fleet are all microlights so you will not be able to re-validate your PPL with them. The samba XXL can be got either as a microlight (MTOW 450kg) or as a permit (MTOW 540kg). Paperwork is the only difference. One of the first XXLs on a Permit has a reg of EI-XLA .
  • Nanolight
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    by Nanolight » Sun Jan 13, 2008 1:45 pm

    I'm sorry, but I was under the impression that Ultraflight's Samba XLA is a group A aircraft which you can fly on a standard PPL(A) and without the need for microlight rating.

    Open to coreection of course... :)
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  • nevergiveup
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    by nevergiveup » Sun Jan 13, 2008 3:43 pm

    Nanolight wrote:I'm sorry, but I was under the impression that Ultraflight's Samba XLA is a group A aircraft which you can fly on a standard PPL(A) and without the need for microlight rating.

    Open to coreection of course... :)


    You are correct but Ultraflight no longer own EI-XLA. However there is no such model as a Samba XLA. They are all Samba XXLs. If its factory built then the paperwork says its microlight, if its home built then its usually permit, though I believe you can home build and register as microlight.
  • nosedive
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    by nosedive » Tue Feb 12, 2008 12:41 pm

    Hi guys - a question slightly off topic but.......

    does anyone know what the position is regarding microlight licences in Ireland and flying a G-reg aircraft in Ireland?

    I hold a PPL(M) issued by the IAA and wonder if it allows me to fly a G-reg microlight based in the Republic (or in the North for that matter).

    Appreciate any information lads and as always, thanks in advance.
    Another broken undercarriage........

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