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JFH
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Post by JFH »

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Last edited by JFH on Sun Mar 10, 2013 10:03 pm, edited 1 time in total.

EV97
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Post by EV97 »

If the expenses are wholly and exclusively for the purpose of your business you can offset them against your business income, but this would only work if you were hoping to be self employed contract pilot and paid as a contractor. Not if your an employee. Make sure you register for tax before you start the training if you want to try this.

This is the revenue's line on employee or self employed.

Guidelines on whether
you are an employee
While all of the following factors
may not apply to your work you
would normally be an employee if
you:
 are under the control of another
person who directs you as to
how, when and where the work
is to be carried out
 supply your labour only
 receive a fixed
hourly/weekly/monthly wage
 cannot sub-contract the work
 do not supply materials for the
job
 do not supply equipment other
than the small tools of the trade
are not exposed to personal
financial risk in carrying out the
work
 work set hours or a given
number of hours per week or
month
 work for one person or for one
business
 are entitled to sick pay/holiday
pay/pension etc.
 receive expense payments to
cover subsistence and/or travel
expenses
 are entitled to extra pay or time
off for overtime.

Guidlines on whether you are self employed
You:
 own your own business
 are exposed to financial risk, by
having to bear the cost of
making good faulty or
substandard work carried out
under the contract
 have control over what you do,
how you do it, when and where
you do it and whether you do it
yourself
 are free to hire other people, on
terms of your own choice to do
the work that you have agreed
to undertake
 can provide the same services to
more than one person/business
at the same time
 provide the materials for the job
 provide equipment and
machinery necessary for the job,
other than the small tools of the
trade
 have a fixed place of business
where you store materials
equipment etc.
 cost and agree a price for the
job
 provide your own insurance
cover e.g. public liability etc.
 control your own hours of work
in fulfilling the job obligations.

Best of luck with your training

TolTol
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Post by TolTol »

Hmm very interesting EV97, wonder what the revenues stance is on Brookfield pilots flying Ryanair's aircraft? Self-Employed or employed?

GoGoGadgetGoAround
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Post by GoGoGadgetGoAround »

Didn't go to the Ryanair seminar, but after talking to someone who did I was told;

1) You need a CPL etc.

2) Registar a company

3) Claim back your 33k etc. or what you can get back from your 737 type rating

The idea being you are a commercial pilot, to get work in Ryanair (on contract, first 6 months is on contract as far as I'm aware) you need a type rating and this type rating is a major expenditure for your company. Haven't talked to anyone who has tried it but it's supposed to work....

1) You need a CPL etc.

Just thought of it now, if the above process can work then you should be able to claim ME/IR, MCC, FIR and whatever other training after your basic CPL you can fit in by useing the same process.

Definatly worth a look into.
Engine Failure: A condition which occurs when all fuel tanks mysteriously become filled with air

TolTol
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Post by TolTol »

Sorry GoGo, misunderstanding. I'm aware of tax rules. But my interpretation of the revenues website would be that the pilot is NOT self employed, therefore Ryanair/Brookfield have to pay the tax!

mr crow
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Post by mr crow »

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Last edited by mr crow on Tue Jan 12, 2010 12:30 am, edited 1 time in total.

EV97
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Post by EV97 »

Ryanair employ's accounts and tax advisers with a lot more experience and knowledge than I do but so im sure its all above board. I know a lot of people who contract in the IT industry under similar circumstances (ie:always working for the one company, direct boss, no exposure to risk ect..)

If the type rating is a valid business expense then the CPL/ME/IR/ATPL should all be too . If your setting up a business to provide a contract pilot then there essential. The snag might be the business should be registered before the expenditure begins. This is all my opinion tax is very complicated and another accountant might give a different opion and the revenue might have a different view too!

Out of interest does anyone know are Ryan arranging the set up of the company for them and charging them for it like the type rating or do the pilots arrange this themselves?

JFH
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Post by JFH »

q
Last edited by JFH on Sun Mar 10, 2013 10:01 pm, edited 1 time in total.

GoGoGadgetGoAround
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Post by GoGoGadgetGoAround »

Another thing you should be aware or is that Ryanair would be delighted to have their pilots on the books as self employed and on contract. It's a lot easier to get rid of you that way. I'm sure they'll be more than happy to assist in employing you this way. Plus side is you save money, downside is they can sack you in a flash. If anyone is more familiar with employment rights correct me if I'm wrong.
Engine Failure: A condition which occurs when all fuel tanks mysteriously become filled with air

GoGoGadgetGoAround
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Post by GoGoGadgetGoAround »

TolTol wrote:Sorry GoGo, misunderstanding. I'm aware of tax rules. But my interpretation of the revenues website would be that the pilot is NOT self employed, therefore Ryanair/Brookfield have to pay the tax!


Hi TolTol,

No worries, was really just giving JFH an idea of the proposed Ryanair process where I think he got the idea for this from.
Engine Failure: A condition which occurs when all fuel tanks mysteriously become filled with air

TolTol
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Post by TolTol »

Ryanair give you no assisstance in setting up a company/sole trader. Once your a Brookfield pilot your on your own.

It all stinks if you ask me.

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