Aerfort Atha Cliath New Peir D

Disscusion on plane spotting, visitors, airlines, routes, airports, equipment etc.

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Akerosid
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Post by Akerosid »

:x :evil:

I agree totally Bearcat. The odd thing is that if you read the Regulator's press release (and I'd have expected the DAA to have done so, before it released its diatribe), he says that he didn't have sufficient information or time to consider the new submission. He also says that when he does and when the govt and its aviation experts (!) have reviewed the plans, he will consider them again and the fee may be reviewed.

Interestingly, this might give the DAA time to review some of its plans, like the fact that out of EUR1.2b, it has failed to assign a brass nickel to expanding air freight facilities; indeed, not only that, the site of the new Pier E takes up stands currently used by the SIA 744F and other large freighters. Given that freight is a key growth area (and that exports and competitiveness are regularly commented upon in the business media and in government strategies, such as the Asia Strategy Report), this is unforgiveable, irresponsible and myopic. Why the govt let them get away with it, I don't know.

Someone needs a sharp jab of a pitchfork in the rear; I don't think Mr. Cullen is the one to do it. We've GOT to start taking aviation seriously in this country.

dowlingm
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Post by dowlingm »

what about a cargo apron between the runways rather than an infield pier?

Akerosid
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Post by Akerosid »

That would be great; there needs to be a place where you can expand capacity to about 500,000t (progressively) and have plenty of space for large widebodies.

However, the point is that not a brass nickel has been set aside for this.

What shocks me is that even though one can shout from the rooftops that cargo has been completely overlooked (as I did last night, sending a press release to about 200+ media outlets and journalists), almost none of them took any interest. Now I know Grounded Ireland is not exactly a household name, but surely someone could have asked for more info or looked into it. Maybe I'm putting too much emphasis on it, but for goodness sake, we're an island nation with regular concerns about exports and competitiveness and when the DAA not only overlooks cargo in its spending plans, but also obstructs its growth, it should be front page news and it should be something the govt slaps the DAA over the head with a wet fish about ... but not a dickie bird.

Instead, the DAA goes on a vitriolic attack against the Regulator, blaming him for the delay when the regulator said, quite clearly that he didn't have the time and info he needed to make his determination.

Sometimes I start to think that the whole running of Irish aviation, from the DAA and the government to the total lack of vision, is more than just ineptitude and complete disinterest. Should I smell a rat? Or are they really that catastrophically devoid of interest and ability? :evil:

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Post by Bearcat »

can one answer me the question why successive governments have neglected aviation expansion in this country? being an island, aviation as a means of connection should be paramount re policy, on the fringes of western europe.

i blame as a i said previously bertie....as mick says an arch didderer. he's happy to black slap with his mates in drumcondra drinking pints of crap smithwicks. he's happy to placate the unions and he's happy to have a yes man as minister of transport who wont rock the boat, who has no vision and will tow the party line= no hassle=no vision=happy life=poor travelling public.

I find it very frustrating when i go airports like FRA, AMS,BUD,etc. Vision was there. They built on preceived demand as against building on current demand and hoping that preceived demand will go away (DAA).

imagine if we had a government that said screw this....our aviation infrastrucure is a joke lets do something.


someone show me some light!!

rgds

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Agree totally!

Post by Akerosid »

I agree totally, Bearcat, it is intenesely frustrating. :x :evil: I've come to the conclusion that the interest really isn't there. Politics comes first and when politics and aviation mix, aviation loses.

That said, we fight on. We set out what needs to be done. I find it absolutely amazing, though, that the government goes on junkets to Asia to build new trade links; you might think it unfair to call them junkets, because this is what they should be doing. However, if they do this, produce reports that advocate increase exports and increased commerce links and THEN, when the main airport - which they have acknowledged to be part of the state's critical infrastructure - proposes to spend NOT A BRASS NICKEL on cargo facilities AND obstructs the expansion of the cargo terminals, they do NOTHING, what do you conclude (apart from that this sentence is too darn long!)?

That's what we're up against. Aviation can, if it's allowed to be, the most cost effective catalyst for economic growth. But we don't let it. We are slow to add new infrastructure, we don't see the point in adding cargo facilities and we have the shortest runway of any major airport in Europe. As if that weren't bad enough, we have bilaterals with very important trading partners - the US and Canada - which do little bit discourage growth.

All of this can be sorted out. It won't happen under the current government, because it has proven time and time again that the interest simply isn't there.

But we won't give up on it.

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Post by Bearcat »

Irish push 'open skies' policy at EU to boost Aer Lingus traffic to America



Todays Indo......how long is a quick deal?



IN a clear change of policy, Ireland will press EU transport ministers later today for a quick deal on the 'open skies' aviation policy with the US.

Although the Government was until recently opposed, then quiet on the issue, it has now become one of the most enthusiastic backers for the abolition of restrictions on all flights between Europe and America.

The creation of a single aviation space will lead to the end of the Shannon stopover, but this was an acceptable price to pay if it would boost both the value of Aer Lingus and the numbers of US visitors to Ireland, explained the Transport Minister Martin Cullen last night.

The Minister last night emphasised his support for both a motorway and rail link from Galway to Shannon Airport to help improve access to the West from Shannon, following lobbying efforts in the region.

"They want to make sure their market base, particularly the Galway side, has access to Shannon. I accept the argument that the infrastructure from Galway, in terms of motorway to Shannon and rail connections, can be speeded up as quickly as possible."

At the moment, half of all transatlantic flights must stop at Shannon on their way to Dublin, but this would be abolished as one of the liberalising measures.

The 'open skies' deal is an attempt to copy the success of similar liberalisation in Europe, which fostered the development of low-fares airlines like Ryanair.

The Government now feels that if it can stimulate similar developments on transatlantic routes, it will reverse the decline in US tourism to Ireland and help Dublin Airport become a hub for American travellers to Europe. Up to 22 US airports have already signalled their interest in operating flights with Aer Lingus.

The development would significantly improve the value of the airline, as the Cabinet prepares its sale.

Akerosid
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Post by Akerosid »

:evil:

Don't cheer too quickly! Although the Indo article was very positive, the IT suggests that the govt is actually not moving that far. It still wants a phased abolition of the stopover (which virtually everyone now recognises is obsolete and doesn't do what it should) ...

This means that it is actually proposing an exception, the effect of which would put Aer Lingus and Irish airports at a competitive disadvantage vis a vis virtually every other airport in Europe.

I guess we were naive to believe that the govt would ever allow something as positive as this to happen without trying to obstruct it. The positive spin of the article is just that - and the papers bought it, hook line and sinker.

Again, to quote Capt. Blackadder: I think the phrase rhymes with Clucking Bell.
:evil: :twisted: :roll: :x :x

Incidentally, there are rumours floating about that EI is the unannounced customer for 10 A350s. Can't help wondering if that's what they wanted to buy ... or were told to? Most reports I've seen over the last year or so pointed to Boeings and they seemed to have precious little interest in the A350. Of course, these were just rumours, BUT the fact that none of the many rumours pointed to 350s suggests that there could have been arm twisting .... or it could have been a BLOODY good deal from Airbus.

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