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Anything to do with the Air Corps...

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GJOYT
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Post by GJOYT » Sat Dec 17, 2005 7:40 pm

So next year when I'm in 5th year in school(Leaving Cert year) when I turn 17 and have my PPL on my birthday(I hope!) can I try and join the Air Coirps? If I was accepted and all could I drop out of school and join them? Or do they only take recruitments at a specific time every year? If they do when?

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Post by Rallye EIBFP » Sat Dec 17, 2005 8:55 pm

If thats the case.........I'd be approaching 40 years of age when I come out! I aggree, it is gauranteed flying....but 15 years is a big chunk of your life!

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Post by Joey D » Fri Dec 23, 2005 1:27 am

G-JOYT wrote:So next year when I'm in 5th year in school(Leaving Cert year) when I turn 17 and have my PPL on my birthday(I hope!) can I try and join the Air Coirps? If I was accepted and all could I drop out of school and join them? Or do they only take recruitments at a specific time every year? If they do when?


The Cadetship competition is advertised in January. It normally finishes at the end of August/early September. Those LC students who apply don't drop out of school as you need the leaving cert. You aren't offered a cadetship until after the leaving cert results come out.

"minimum of Grade C3 in 3 Higher Level papers and Grade D3 in 3
Ordinary/Higher level papers, in a single sitting of the Leaving Certificate
Examination.A candidate?s educational qualifications must include, as a minimum, agrade D3 in Ordinary/Higher level papers in each of the following subjects:

*Mathematics;
*Irish and/or English;
*A modern European language and/or Latin and/or Greek;"


About the flying experience, it would be wise to find out whether you like flying before you'd go for a career in it.

Also in the prelim and final interview there is a technical aptitude section where you are asked flying related questions and having a knowledge of flying would be a help.

For the pychomoter tests, one of the tests is sitting in front of a computer screen with the 6 primary instruments of a cockpit displayed. There are about 20 different scenarios (with the instruments in the different positions) and you're given a multiple choice on what the plane is doing. Again if you had flying experience you'd 'fly' through this test! (pardon the pun)

Finally, there were a number of guys this year who got the IAC cadets who had PPLs (including a former RAF University squadron pilot).

You should really have a look at the brochure, heres a link to the 2005 one. Ring up in the new year and get the 2006 one sent out to you, incase there are any changes:

http://www.military.ie/images/pdfs%20for%202005/cadet05.pdf


Edit: also, the link that you gave a few posts back is for recruits not cadetships, check out this one instead:

http://www.military.ie/careers/cadetships.htm

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Post by FLYbyWIT » Fri Dec 23, 2005 8:06 pm

This may be a surprise to you but after your initial training period your yearly amount of flying can and most likely will be very very low.
Be prepared to spend alot of time behind a desk and bashing the square.
Unless you have seriously considered the military aspect and amount of desk time comparable to cockpit time, dont expect to be racking up serious hours to forward your aviation career.
If you have a strong desire to serve your country go for it and know the fleet and basic principles of flight / navigation etc etc and also helps if you have a good understanding of the aer corps services and abilities.
Would help to know the basics of a FN or Styre also just for brownie points.

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Post by JFH » Sat Dec 24, 2005 12:57 am

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Post by TCAS » Sat Dec 24, 2005 8:59 pm

FLYbyWIT wrote:This may be a surprise to you but after your initial training period your yearly amount of flying can and most likely will be very very low.


I wouldnt exactly classify an average of 300 flying hours per year as 'low'. In fact Air Corps pilots surpass international military air force annual average flying times by approximately 50% in their first 10 years of flying. The vast majority of serving Air Corps pilots (approx 90%) have an average of 3000 flying hours after 10 years service, in the RAF, this figure is just over 2000.


FLYbyWIT wrote:Be prepared to spend alot of time behind a desk and bashing the square.


Not quite true, like all military organisations, there are many other tasks to which Officers, NCO's and Airmen must perform that may not relate specifically to aviation, this is simply part of the military ethos and nature of military life. If that doesnt exactly suit an individual, then dont join, but during the many years i spent in service i cannot recall once seeing an officer pilot "bashing the square" as you put it.


FLYbyWIT wrote:Dont expect to be racking up serious hours to forward your aviation career.


May i ask what have the following the following people got in common? The former Chief Executive of the Irish Aviation Authority, the Chief Air Accident Investigator of the Irish Aviation Authority, the Director of Operations in Ryanair, the Chief Pilot in Ryanair, the head of Training in Ryanair, 50% of Base Captains in Ryanair, the Chief Executive of Cityjet, the Chief Pilot in Cityjet, the head of Training in Cityjet, former head of Training in Aer Lingus, former Director of Flight Safety in Aer Lingus, the Chief Pilot in Air Contractors, the Chief Pilot in CHC Ireland as we know it??......
"All Ex Irish Military", just a few examples but somehow i doubt they would agree with you that their time and military training in the Air Corps was time mis-spent.


FLYbyWIT wrote:Would help to know the basics of a FN or Styre also just for brownie points.


The Permanent Defence Forces havent used the FN since 1988 if memory serves me correctly, so not quite sure what your point is there, and i have never ever heard of an Air Corps interview board asking questions as to operating principles of a Steyr.. Not hugely relevant to be honest.

So in summary, would it not be better to get the 'facts' correct before you start giving career advice to others????

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Post by JFH » Sun Dec 25, 2005 6:49 pm

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Post by FLYbyWIT » Sun Dec 25, 2005 8:01 pm

I offering the view my brother had on it after serving many a year in BAL as a pilot now in the airlines as am I. I have the facts and opinions of people who have been there which Id love to share from time to time but why bother when theres people who already know everything there is to know about anything, listen mate go and lighten up abit and grow up abit.
By the way 300hrs/year aint low but it aint exactly high either.
Throw whatever numbers ya like at me if it makes you feel any more important.

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Post by Nanolight » Mon Dec 26, 2005 10:42 am

300 hours flying is less than one hour per day on average. What do they do with the rest of their time?

It is very important to bear in mind that the Air Corps is still the military, and the initial cadet training is quite tough. You are initially trained with army cadets for (i think) 7 months before you even go near an aeroplane. You need to be mentally and physically fit for that!

Can anyone tell me if having a degree is an advantage if going for the aircorps? I know it is for the army and navy alright. I would also like to know if you pick fixed or rotary wing aircraft, or is it picked for you by thje powers that be???
Smoke me a kipper, I'll be back for breakfast.

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Post by JFH » Mon Dec 26, 2005 2:09 pm

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Post by Bob » Tue Dec 27, 2005 12:55 pm

think its 12 years.. but if you look at it like that, that means thats 12 years guaranteed flying!


I wouldn't advise you to take that view if your going for the cadets you want to be thinking as much about military life as about flying. It'll be 15 months of very tough tacticle training. Which by the way is the exact same as an army/navy cadet will do.

In relation to the quote it could very easily be 12 or 15 years spent on the ground if you don't pass your flying be cause of medical or just failing exams.

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Post by JFH » Wed Jan 04, 2006 10:15 pm

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JFH
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Post by JFH » Wed Jan 18, 2006 10:09 pm

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Eddie Dillon
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Post by Eddie Dillon » Fri Apr 21, 2006 7:47 pm

In relation to the time the AC cadets spend with the army, it's approx 9 months, then it's a further year in Baldonnell. It's tough enough training but manageable if you're fit. And it's entirely possible you can fail exams and be given the option to become a ground officer. Good luck to any applicants this year

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Post by squigs » Sat Jul 15, 2006 1:03 pm

as far as i know the ac cadets spend six months training with the army/navy cadets in the curragh. Then it is off to the don for probably a very interesting two yrs of flight training, at the end of which i think you have a ATPL.. or the military equivilant. What is the big deal with how long you are in the AC for? 12yrs 15yrs....it shouldnt make a difference, if i was in charge of selecting possible cadets i wouldnt show much interest in the candidates who are just wondering when they can escape to the airlines.....and the odds are that in 15yrs the AC may be considering purchases of aircraft faster than PC-9M's....jets maby(probably s**t ones...but who cares??!! they are jets!!)....dont quote me on that... :roll: ....my message to candidates is to slow down planning your future and to just concentrate on the best way to portray yourself to a cadet board...in my opinion its all about the competencies....and aptitudes obviously...if ya dont have them..then its tough titty!! :wink:

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