IAA Aviation Policy Conference.

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Fanstop
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IAA Aviation Policy Conference.

Post by Fanstop »

Does anyone know if there will be any GA reps at the Conference on Aviation Policy to be held by the IAA in Dublin on 2nd December?
Attendance is by invitation only. Just curious to see if they have ignored us again ??? maybe not. However the list of speakers would suggest that yet again they will ignore a significant part of aviation activity including basic training of flight crews, maintenance and tourism.

Higgie
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Re: IAA Aviation Policy Conference.

Post by Higgie »

HI ALL
Very little, ie. NO mention of GA. Appeared to be aimed at commercial enterprises who all seemed to just want to protect and grow their own patch.
Two very prominent individuals suggested that all of the regional airports should be shut down ASAP.
Only dublin, shannon, cork and belfast should remain.
Good news is that public consultation is due to start in January with the aim of developing a " Civil Aviation Policy for Ireland"
That would be the time to have some well thought out arguments, eg.
The benefits of GA to the local economy, the benefits to the airlines, maintenance organisations etc.
The current practice of sending a large number of our prospective commercial pilots overseas to train etc.
How many Chinese commercial pilots could we train here if properly resourced and backed by the Regulator and the Government.etc
Don't give me the argument about the weather.
We have the best weather, terrain and airspace in the world for training commercial pilots.
Make your voices heard in January
Regards
Higgie

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Jim
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Re: IAA Aviation Policy Conference.

Post by Jim »

Firstly, let me apologize for not updating everyone on this forum lately.
Those that know my situation understand where i unfortunately stand at present.

As for the Conference on Irish Aviation Policy, GA need not exist, unless it can produce elaborate funds!
http://www.iaa.ie/index.jsp?p=106&n=520&a=556" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;
Defending the rights of GA in Ireland.
http://www.aopa.ie" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;

JFH
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Post by JFH »

B
Last edited by JFH on Thu Feb 07, 2013 8:10 pm, edited 2 times in total.

Pilot
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Re: IAA Aviation Policy Conference.

Post by Pilot »

Actually I think Ireland has a HUGE opportunity to make a fortune from flight training, but our governement doesn't seem to see it.

Most commerical aviation takes place through English. So most commerical pilots will be taught through English.

Presently they go to the USA in huge numbers to do that. But that has become more awkard due to visa requirement etc.

Other big English centres? Well the UK is one obviously. But they have busy and complicated airspace. Not ideally suited to intensive training.

Australia is another possibility of course.

Ireland is a good possibility too. Plenty of open airspace. Visa's not so much of an issue. Most of our rules follow ICAO norms. Our climate is well suited to the IR part of the training. Plenty of quite regional airports for practicing instrument approaches.

What would be required to get them here? Well cost is the big attraction of the USA still. But if the government would reduce drastically the taxes on avgas for commerical training that would change that. IAA controls most (all?) of the ATCers in Ireland. If they used that positon to ensure that GA was treated in the same way as in the USA and given equal priority that would be a huge addition too.

And finally...some forethought and marketing.

What the government loses in Avgas duty, they would more than make up for in additional payroll taxes and VAT etc which comes from having a booming industry.

But of course, commerically, the IAA looks at airlines, not the commerical end of GA. :(

A huge opportunity overlooked.

StrikeCommand
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Re: IAA Aviation Policy Conference.

Post by StrikeCommand »

I wasn't at the conference (but apparently didn't miss anything), so I'm depending on the info on the IAA website. The presentations/speeches say a lot about the "stakeholders". Of the 20 presentations listed only 3 of the speakers really had anything to say. The rest were pure waffle and wasting everyone's time. Most of them just put together a Powerpoint presentation with a few airline/airport related photos, some nice colourful logos and a few buzzwords like "Connectivity" and "Interlining" (whatever that is) thrown in.

For a conference that was supposed to be about the future direction of Civil Aviation Policy, attended by the Minister for Transport and regulators/decision makers, it's amazing that so few speakers came along with any ideas and definite proposals for what is needed and concrete actions. It was a chance to tell the Minister, you need to do A,B,C etc but instead they served up tripe.
The exceptions were:
(1) Michael O'Leary - Ryanair. It doesn't matter whether you like him or his business model or not, he was there to do business and had a lot to say.
(2) Conor McCarthy - Dublin Aerospace. He had definite proposals about how MROs could be supported by making hangarage exempt from rates. About cutting out un-necessary bureaucracy to do with Airside passes, security in maintenance areas, IAA availability for certification inspections, capital allowances for engineering equipment etc. He was talking about the kind of real jobs which we need - the real technical & engineering roles - not the kind of cyber crap that the Government seems to think passes for "Technology" these days. These were definite actions that could be taken, relatively easily and see some results.
(3)Graham Doyle - Waterford Airport - I thought he had some interesting philosophical things to say, if a little rambling.

The rest were there possibly as lingering symptoms of the Social Partnership disease. David Begg clearly knows very little about aviation (did he even get a briefing from any SIPTU or other union shop stewards/organisers in the aviation sector). The usual clowns from IBEC and the Chambers of Commerce.
The DAA CEO, presented indecipherable graphs which didn't convey any real information - especially the one of customer/passenger satisfaction.

But getting back to GA - which was nowhere to be seen - Mr McCarthy (Dublin Aerospace, not An Bord Snip Nua!), had an interesting graphic showing the pyramid of various roles in aviation and who supplies them. He was only concerned with repair & maintenance engineering but the same pyramid could be drawn up for aircrew and flying clubs would definitely have to be the base of that pyramid.

pensive
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Re: IAA Aviation Policy Conference.

Post by pensive »

Not been on the forum for a long time but seeing the IAA thread caused me to remember a recent comment by a work colleague. The IAA have more rotary flight ops inspectors than the UK CAA. Now consider the number of AOC's rotary in Ireland vs UK, include the fact that several in the North Sea are massive operations. Is the Irish taxpayer getting value for money? Jobs for the boys? Those at the top just there to justify their existance and cream off a nice civil servants salary and pension at the expense of the hard working tax payer? End rant. :evil:

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Jim
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Re: IAA Aviation Policy Conference.

Post by Jim »

It was more of a WAFFLERS PARADISE than a conference!
Advertising was included, and so was the buddy-buddy regime.
But, it was certainly NO conference to many in attendance.
One stated he had “attended an IFA meeting with far more magnetism” then he left to go for a drink instead of that “I am me attitude”!

I received my official invitation dated 27th of September on 2nd of October, signed by Eamonn Brennan the CEO of the IAA.

This was attached to the Conference Brochure which detailed those “Chosen” to speak.

I emphasize CHOSEN because, while speaking face to face with a prominent member of the Authority on 5th of October, I was informed that the speakers were in fact “chosen” and, as myself or others from the Aviation sector were not on the list, we would not be allowed to speak.

The letter of invitation contained the following words…….

“Involving all stakeholders”
Made me wonder if it was typed out after a few pints! OR, was the GA sector omitted on purpose?

“The conference provides you with the opportunity to help shape the future aviation policy”
Is this possible without being allowed to speak? Perhaps sign language should have been considered! Maybe the IAA should look up the word “Conference”.

“Our extensive speaker list provides significant National and International expertise and covers a broad range of key interest areas”
Pity it covered less than 80% of what really matters in the Irish Aviation sector.

“Attendance will be at the highest international level and from across all sectors of the economy”
Half of them must have been hidden in the Bar!!

Once again, I believe, it was a sadly missed opportunity for Irish Aviation, but much more than that. It could have also been a great opportunity to integrate GA with some of those sectors present and open up future opportunities for benefiting from our separate sectors.
Will they ever learn?
Defending the rights of GA in Ireland.
http://www.aopa.ie" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;

StrikeCommand
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Re: IAA Aviation Policy Conference.

Post by StrikeCommand »

Draft policy document now published and a further chance to make more submissions which will of course be ignored yet again.
http://www.dttas.ie/aviation/publicatio ... ion-policy" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;

Note that there is no list of who made submissions.
It is normal practice when carrying out a public consultation to list the bodies who made submissions. (E.g. county development plans etc). That is part of the "transparency".

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