Requirements of the Terrorism Act 2000

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cubpilot
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Post by cubpilot »

it is still a requirement that both uk customs and the police be notified of flights except when the flight is to a customs designated airport. the same form is used for both and details are there of phone and fax numbers.

j3cub

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Bladecrack
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Post by Bladecrack »

You wont get asked for your GAR etc at EGAB. No silly performance needed. As long as you have a plan in the system, they'll know so you just sign their drawback form.


j3, I wouldn't like to use this as my defence in court!

Bearcat,
Schedule 7 of the PTA still applies to GA aircraft entering and leaving NI (except via PTA designated airports) and you are required to submit a GAR by fax or email to NCU (National Clearing Unit - HMRC) on 08702403738 or ncu@hmce.gsi.gov.uk at least 12 hours before the flight. You may well get away without complying, that is until you get caught!

BC

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Post by JarJar »

Completely agree Bladecrack. Only last week the EGAB authorities reported a chap to Customs who had uplifted duty free without a flight plan in the system. As regards submitting GAR forms I personally have met a pilot who got the maximum £1000 and 3 months for landing at Tatenhill without submitting the GAR.
J3 all Flight plans go to Special Branch automatically and I'm reliably informed that men wearing wigs in court seem to lack a sense of humour
It's up to you.
JJ

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Post by Pilot »

Like said above, the GAR has to be submitted 12 hours in advance.

It's not too bad....if you want to go at 10am, you just have to file it before 10pm the night before. Doesn't allow spur of the moment trips, but doesn't need to be days before.

Be consious that your local airport operator may have other considtions for you on leaving Ireland, to allow them to comply with Irish customs regulations.

Weston for example want 24 hours notice to the airport, of all international departures.

Kilrush require you to give 3 hours notice direct to the customs office.

I've no idea what other airports requirement are, but I'd be interested to hear ;)

j3cub

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stovepipe
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Post by stovepipe »

Hi all,
With respect, in my very limited experience of crossing the Border by air, the reception has been either rigid enforcement of the letter of the law or a very casual "sure, that'll be grand" attitude. On at least two occasions, when the Border was "hotter", I had up-close views of Puma helicopters, despite having dotted all the i's,etc. I was also told by a man well -regarded in microlight circles, based in Norn Iron, that Southern aviators were regarded in less than glowing terms, in some quarters, for their failure to comply exactly with the crossing terms. As for crossing the Irish Sea,well, there are some among us who seem to regard it as their duty not to speak to ATC if they can at all avoid it;)
J3, could you not get some cheap fuel from your pals in the Sandpit? :wink:
regards
Stovepipe

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Post by YoYo »

Pilot

Kilrush does not require 3 hours notice. If you check the wording Customs & Excise require 3 hours notice from any PIC leaving the state from any airfield (non Customs airfield) in Ireland. It has been put on the Kilrush web site for simplicity and to draw pilots attention to it. The notice should appear on all airfield web sites

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Post by Pilot »

YoYo...that's interesting...I hadn't even seen the Kilrush airfield website. My info came from a pilot who got a letter from Revenue concerning his use of Kilrush. The 3 hours requirement is certainly different than head office Revenue requirements.

For fear of upsetting cub any further with thread drift, I'll email you...I'd like to know more about this from your point of view.

P

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Post by jonkil »

j3cub wrote:Much clipped
1) Bearcat asked "are they still at the prevention of terrorism form to be submitted days before or can i just head off" and we all know the answer from our Air Law books. But in reality - No - GAR forms are not sought by this particular airport from any landing I've ever made. I do the trip every week. My friends in Sligo do it twice a week - sometimes upside down.... If it makes you feel better, fax as you wish. We do know Bearcat is pilot with our national flag carrier. Take it he would be entirely familiar with the legal requirements, but merely asked what was the custom in this particular airport. He could do without a lecture too.

J3


Agreed J3,
I think if I and others filed GAR forms everytime we flew "up north" to certain airports/airfields, we would be better taking up shorthand for a hobby and forget the flying. :roll:
Cant comment on avgas prices as I use the more common stuff !... I know filing a flight plan to some northern fields gets you the fuel duty free, remember stating it on another thread and got a bit of a grilling over it, never responded, life is too short.

cubpilot
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Post by cubpilot »

jonkil, don't forget if you are filling the other stuff up north you are entitled to claim drawback at ( i think it is still unaltered by recent budgets ) 50.35 p/ltr. just have the garage recepits attached to your form which goes to the mineral oils relief unit. it does not matter how often you travel so long as the flight planned trip out of uk actually does land outside the uk. the customs guys do cross check the flight plans for activation and completion of flight.
note you are entitled to claim on the full tankage of the plane if there is uplift at the last point of departure. if the uplift is less than the full quantity and there is residual fuel that has been uplifted in uk with no intervening flight abroad you can submit that residual amount for relief as well.
if you make a trasit flight after full uplift and then depart uk you have to deduct the quantity used from the claim.
many pilots departing uk fail to claim their full entitlement and just accept the duty free offer by the refueler at their point of departure. I now always pay the taxed amount and then make my claim later on
with a large tankage i find this makes good financial sense and significantly reduces my flying costs.
contact me for a pdf of the form

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Post by JarJar »

Pilot,
The only field I know with Customs clearance is Trim and The Conditions of Approval item 5 states "At least 12 hours notice of each intended departure or arrival to or from any EU country is to be given to the appropriate Customs and Excise Office in Portlaoise"
I can't speak for any other field.
Kilrush seems lucky at 3 hours!
JJ

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Post by JarJar »

Pilot,
The only field I know with Customs clearance is Trim and The Conditions of Approval item 5 states "At least 12 hours notice of each intended departure or arrival to or from any EU country is to be given to the appropriate Customs and Excise Office in Portlaoise"
I can't speak for any other field.
Kilrush seems lucky at 3 hours!
JJ

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Post by Pilot »

Thanks JarJar ;)

Bladecrack
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Post by Bladecrack »

)
Bearcat asked "are they still at the prevention of terrorism form to be submitted days before or can i just head off" and we all know the answer from our Air Law books. But in reality - No - GAR forms are not sought by this particular airport from any landing I've ever made. I do the trip every week. My friends in Sligo do it twice a week - sometimes upside down.... If it makes you feel better, fax as you wish. We do know Bearcat is pilot with our national flag carrier. Take it he would be entirely familiar with the legal requirements, but merely asked what was the custom in this particular airport. He could do without a lecture too.


J3,
Whe don't you actually read the rules instead of simply offering your duff advice, it's not actually the airport that require the GAR details, and just because you don't bother complying only goes to further prove the ignorant attitude of some southern based pilots..

Southern aviators were regarded in less than glowing terms, in some quarters, for their failure to comply exactly with the crossing terms.


Not my words, but all you achieve by ignoring the law is to bring further scrutiny on everyone, including those who do comply.

There is a thing called a landing card. Were a well intentioned Aviator otherwise in compliance with the law, not to have his GAR form received at the appropriate station the only realistic punishment he would face is filling out a landing card. Quite different from the 3 months rectal torture inaccurately portrayed earlier.


If you ever tried reading a flight guide you would see Enniskillen is not notified under the PTA meaning a GAR is required.

Anyway, my most humble apologies for offering some helpful advice to Bearcat when it was asked for, how rude of me. I hope you still have some toys left to throw out of your cot? :roll:

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