Buying a G reg microlight....

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nosedive
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Buying a G reg microlight....

Post by nosedive » Mon Sep 22, 2008 12:09 pm

Hello all, I find myself in the nice position of being in the market for an aircraft and need a little advice.

I have my eye on an aircraft based in the UK and just wonder what the complexities are about buying it and operating it here on am irish license.

The aircraft in question is a permit aircraft currently undergoing it's permit renewal, I'm wondering what might be involved in getting the aircraft on to the EI reg (or could I operate here on G reg with an Irish licence? Also the plane is a microlight taildragger - I have an Irish PPL (M) but have never flown a taildragger - As I understand it a taildragger rating applies to all t'draggers once qualified- would this carry over to micros as well? Ie could I go off and get t'dragger rating and tack it on to my PPL (M)??

Guys as always anything you may have to contribute woud be appreciated. Thanks in advance.

Nosedive.
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alphaLaura
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Post by alphaLaura » Mon Sep 22, 2008 2:29 pm

Getting a sign-off on a taildragger is just that - a 'sign-off'. It's not a rating, but just 'differences training'. Once the instructor is happy with your ability to fly an aircraft with a wheel at the back, then you're signed off and this should be regardless of aircraft category.
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Post by damienair » Mon Sep 22, 2008 2:39 pm

Hello Nosedive,

I have a G-reg Microlight also which I brought in from the uk. When you bring the aircraft into Ireland all you have to do is send a copy of the permit to fly, certificate of registration, pilots licence, noise cert and also proof of insurance into the Airworthiness dept in the IAA, with a covering letter asking for permission to operate the aircraft in Ireland. Unfortunately you need to do this after every permit.

Otherwise you can very simply put it on the EI-reg, the previous owner of the aircraft will give you the certificate of registration from the CAA, which will be changed over to your name. Once you recieve this certificate from the CAA simply fill in the section at the rear of the certificate stating you wish to de-register the aircraft, once you get the de-registration certificate back just send it into the IAA or NMAI Tech office with a form requesting an application for Registration/Change of ownership, this form can be found on the IAA website www.iaa.ie under the section for forms , Airworthiness Application Forms. It sounds very long winded, but once you recieve the deregistration form back from the CAA, you should have an EI-reg within a week. Then the aircraft will need to have a permit and check flight done through the NMAI.

I would recommend you ring some of the Microlight schools, just so as to get difference training onto a taildragger. I trained in Kernan Aviation and I know that they used to train a few years ago on taildragger thrusters, I am sure the same is true of Newtonards. All you need is a couple of hours in circuits getting used to landing and taking off. There is'nt a particular rating as such, but you just have the difference training signed off by an instructor which covers you. It will count towards the 1 hour you have to do with an instructor every 2 years now anyway with the NPPL(M).

gOOD LUCK,

dAMIEN
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nosedive
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Post by nosedive » Mon Sep 22, 2008 3:55 pm

Thanks for the responses guys - all sounds feasible enough. Now all i need is the courage to actually commit funds and get my hands on a machine!

Thanks again guys.
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Post by buggyB » Mon Sep 22, 2008 5:26 pm

It may sound like an obvious question but you might want to think about how you plan on getting it back from the UK.

Flying might seem like the solution but most microlight aircraft lack gyro attitude instruments and flying over water on a hazy day can be very disorientating,the horizon merges into the sea. A lot of microlights do cross over to the UK but you do need good weather to do it, and they have the advantage of being on the same side of the puddle as their aircraft and can go at an hours notice. You will probably have to organise flights, transport to the airfield, a day off work etc. Given our recent weather (discounting our belated summer the last few days) it might be difficult to plan for a particular day. The weather may be good there but windy back home when you are committed to land. You may also want to factor in the possibility of losing the engine over water, life expectancy in the Irish Sea with just a life jacket is less than an hour. Of course the aircraft wont know its over water.

That leaves you with 2 options: Trailering or ferrying (having someone fly it over for you). Trailering involves finding an appropriatly sized trailer for that type and de-rigging the wings. It will have to be secured with out damaging it and covered to protect from the elements and to stop the tail surfaces getting damaged from the airflow (tail surfaces become effective at low speeds). The price of a long trailer on the ferry is high enough these days. You could always have it shipped but the costs would be high.

That leaves ferrying. You may have a friend willing to fly it over or if not there are people who offer this service. When we brought ours over we got a guy called Bob Cole to do it. He relocated the aircraft to Haverford West and hangered it there. Then on the first good day he got he flew it over and we collected him, bought him lunch and a ticket back to Cardiff and dropped him back to the airport. All he wanted was costs, apparently he gets a kick out of flying different types. It's worth noting that the aircraft was in Haverford West for over a month (that was around September as well) before Bob would attempt the crossing.

I don't want rain on your parade here but this is exactly the thought process that we went through when importing. I'm not saying not to buy in the UK, just that the logistics must be considered as well. So delighted were we with the aircraft that we didn't stop to consider the recovery costs. Ferrying turned out to be the most practical for us but wasn't cheap either, $600 when it was added up. Some aircraft come will extra ground handling gear or storage equipment (covers etc) and it might not be possible to fly these over with the aircraft. Food for thought.

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Post by Lambada Crazy » Mon Sep 22, 2008 8:07 pm

HI,

As far as i am aware if the aircraft is a catagory (A) aircraft, you will need a PPL(A), However, if the aircraft is a Microlight Taildragger, then you could fly it as alphalaura suggests. Same as the other Way around, if you have a PPL(A), you cant fly a Microlight!
There is no seperate rating for a taildragger as far as i know, the rating is a Single Engine Piston. But you will still need differences training due to it being a tailwheel.
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Post by damienair » Mon Sep 22, 2008 8:34 pm

If you have a PPL(A) you can fly a Microlight no problem, the hours spent flying Microlights don't however count towards your PPL(A) LOG. PPL(A) holders are advised to do difference training with an Instructor due to the type differences. Often times 1 hour has a PPL(A) holder signed off.
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nosedive
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Post by nosedive » Mon Sep 22, 2008 8:45 pm

Thanks guys - I have a PPL (M) and the aircraft is indeed a microlight Micros are all I ever plan to fly in some shape or form...

BuggyB thanks for the input - it's all food for thought though I have to admit I never considered getting the aircraft ferried over.

As always, any comments are welcome, it's always good to see all sides of an argument and have light shed on other points of view.
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