Importing Aircraft

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Mark H
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Importing Aircraft

Post by Mark H »

If someone buys a German registered microlight and brings it to Ireland can it operate under the German weight restrictions or does this change to the Irish? Does it have to be re-registered? Can it be flown on a german or english nPPL(m)?

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German / Irish Microlights

Post by Bald Eagle »

Mark, If the aircraft type has previously been imported and permitted in either Ireland or England, you won't have much of a problem. If this is the first one then you will have to contact the NMAI who process 1st time imports. I think there is a minimum ?1000 fee for same. Log onto www.nmai.ie for contact details. Currently microlights are country specific i.e. each country has its own regulations governing use etc. To comply with the law you should have an Irish Licence!

Good Luck with your endeavours

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Re: German / Irish Microlights

Post by jonkil »

Or a "foreign" licence, such as UK NPPL(m) validated by the IAA !

Bald Eagle wrote: To comply with the law you should have an Irish Licence!


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Importing an Aircraft

Post by Bald Eagle »

P.S.
Mark, as Jon knows my last line is a standing joke in Microlight circles. In Ireland there isn't any legal microlight licence. What is supposed to be a licence in in actual fact a figment of the imagination of a 'Hitler type' person who unfortunately happens to be in charge of the licencing section of the IAA. The UK NPPL(M) is the defacto licence here in Ireland whether validated or not. Validation is also a joke as there arn't any laws governing that either as is the case with the so called Irish Microlight licence.
Unfortunately a bit of a minefield!!! Its best that you join the NMAI as they will guide you and keep you informed of all the correct procedures. Current membership is ?70 per year and includes a monthly newsletter plus access to a members only forum.

Cheers

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Post by MCRO »

These circular postings must ground sometime

Ireland is UNABLE to offer a microlight licence of the type we see elsewhere because the IAA Act does not provide for such activity

We have to be content with ICAO licences

We are sometimes told ICAO doesn't spply to microlights

What ICAO has been heard to say is that they it not plan a special
licence for microlights - which are coverd by the basic aeroplane licence

Maurice

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Post by Bluebeard »

Maurice,
"We are sometimes told ICAO doesn't apply to microlights "

My FAA licence has no lower weight limit as far as I know, it is valid for flying any single piston engine landplane from zero lbs up to I think 12500 lbs.

What is the regulatory source for de-recognising an ICAO licence that entitles its holder to fly a plane, on the basis that it is too light?

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Post by MCRO »

Sorry Bluebeard if I was ambiguous

The thrust of my final para is that ICAO are thought not to be developing a special licence for microlights which they regard as aeroplanes that may be flown on an ICAO PPL

(As I remember usual - you and I tend to agree)

For outside-the-USA use the issues continue :

: US have withdrawn Class 3 Medical from ICAO

: US Class 2 Medicals allow pregnancy and something else non-ICAO

: For recognition abroad under ICAO a licence is supposed to carry
a statement that it is issued under Annex 1

These deficicienies can be righted by individual validation, but this is a
helluva nuisance if flying through several countries

Best cheer

Maurice

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Post by MCRO »

The British NPPL

An excellen licence - just look at the training syllabus

Trouble is it doesn't automatically validate

When the post above states many people fly on it here is it meant that many people fly (Unlicensed) or that many have succeeded in the tedious validation process - which I abandoned in 2004

Would loe to know if this has become generally attainable

Maurice

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Post by Bluebeard »

Maurice
"These deficienies can be righted by individual validation, but this is a
helluva nuisance if flying through several countries "

Validation is by the country of registration; I have checked out the acceptance of this validation with a large number of European countries and haven't had a problem. So in practice it's not really a nuisance.

NPPL: I would be interested to hear how this might be validated in Ireland, if at all. It can be accepted in France and other countries, but on a flight by flight basis which is not very practical. Maybe this issue will be superseded by the proposed EASA licence.

We're drifting a bit off-topic!

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FAA PPL

Post by Bald Eagle »

My FAA licence has no lower weight limit as far as I know, it is valid for flying any single piston engine landplane from zero lbs up to I think 12500 lbs.


Bluebeard, your FAA PPL which is an ICAO licence only entitles you to fly ICAO Certified aircraft. Microlights and UK Group A Permit aircraft are not ICAO Certified therefore you cannot fly them on your FAA ticket!
Not only that but you can't fly Microlight aircraft on a JAA ticket either!

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Strongly disagree

Post by hum »

Bald Eagle, sorry to disagree, but I believe you yourself are starting to digress into the 'a figment of the imagination' category with your last post...

Wherever did you get the notion that an FAA licence applied to ICAO certified types only????

My FAA licence says I have been found to be properly qualified to exercise the privileges of a pilot of 'airplane single engine land & sea........' nothing about ICAO certified.

Are you saying that all the FAA licensed pilots in the world (of whom there are more that all the rest put together) are illegally flying their non-ICAO certified (experimental, microlight, warbird etc) aircraft?

I think not......

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FAA PPL

Post by Bald Eagle »

Bald Eagle, sorry to disagree, but I believe you yourself are starting to digress into the 'a figment of the imagination' category with your last post...


Hum,
I suggest that you talk to the IAA, CAA, FAA about their respective licencing requrements, privilages etc. before making statements on here about them.
When you've done that, can you post your findings on here please?

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Post by hum »

I have spent over 35 years talking to all 3 agencies, have licences issued by each and am not interested in a public argument. You are welcome to think an FAA PPL holder is only entitled to fly ICAO-certified aircraft, I believe you are wrong.

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FAA PPL

Post by Bald Eagle »

Hum,
You can talk for 100 years but if you haven't asked specific questions, you won't have specific answers.
If some poor unfortunate follows your advice and falls foul of some law enforcement agency due to an accident or otherwise, will YOU indemnify them against all losses including insurance losses? Because as we all know insurance companies will walk away if your licence is not fully legal? And they will have a good laugh if the unfortunate states that he thought he was legal, because he was told he was, on the Flying in Ireland Website by a Mr. Hum.
P.S.
I have asked the specific questions referred to, from all 3 agencies mentioned and also the LBA. And in all cases your information is incorrect & dangerously misleading.
Those same questions will be asked by the AAIU of the IAA, CAA, FAA etc in an accident investigation and if they answer them as they did me then your insurance company won't pay out!

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Post by Pilot »

Bauld,

Your position as stated makes no sense.

Irish JAR licences are used to fly EI permit aircraft.
CAA JAR licences are what are used to fly UK permit aircraft.
FAA licences are what are used to fly USA experment aircraft.

There is no such thing as needing an non ICAO licence to fly a non ICAO aircraft.

Any ICAO licence is AUTOMATICALLY validated by SI for use in Irish registered aircraft. Therefore the holder of an FAA licence is in pretty much the exact same position as an Irish JAR licenced pilot in an EI reg aircraft.

You position is either being totally missinterperited by the rest of us, or is incredibly strange. Can you back it up with a reference?

P

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