IAA Flight Check - PPL

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toddy
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IAA Flight Check - PPL

Post by toddy »

Hi there,

What are the favourite routines for the IAA DE have for doing flight checks from Weston/Dublin?

Converting from FAA - do you give me "special" attention if you possess a stateside licence?

Toddy

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Post by YoYo »

Toddy

Why do you want to convert your FAA license to an IAA one?

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Post by toddy »

so I can fly EI a/c outside of Ireland...is this possible with an FAA ticket?

N714GZ
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Post by N714GZ »

You'll need it to fly EI aircraft in Ireland too, unless it's surpervised solo flight-in other words authorised by a flight instructor as part of your conversion. You cannot exercise the privilages of an FAA licence on a JAR regulated aircraft. In this or any other country.

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Post by 900EX »

QUOTE "You cannot exercise the privilages of an FAA licence on a JAR regulated aircraft. In this or any other country."

Your statement seems a little misleading. For example in the U.K the ANO Article 21 states -

Exercising the privileges of a JAA Licence or an ICAO licence in UK Registered Aircraft

We have received a number of enquiries from Non-UK licence holders about the privileges of their licence within the UK. The situation is as follows:-

Article 21, of the Air Navigation Order 2000, states, that a pilot must hold an appropriate licence granted either by the UK CAA or by a foreign authority and rendered valid under the ANO to fly a UK registered aircraft.

A JAA licence is deemed to be a licence rendered valid under the ANO unless the CAA in the particular case gives a direction to the contrary. A JAA licence is a licence issued in accordance with licensing and medical requirements of JAR-FCL by a full JAA Member State that has been recommended for mutual recognition by Central JAA (JAA Headquarters). For the current mutual recognition status of JAA Member States please select this link.

A licence issued by any other ICAO Contracting State (including a JAA State that has not yet been recommended for mutual recognition) is also deemed to be valid under the ANO for the purposes of flying a UK registered aircraft, providing that the licence and medical are valid in accordance with the rules/laws of the issuing State, and the CAA does not in the particular case give direction to the contrary. However, Article 21 (4) (a) states that the holder of such a licence cannot:

1) Act as a member of the flight crew of any aircraft flying for the purpose of public transport or aerial work or on any flight in respect of which he receives remuneration for his services as a member of the flight crew; or

2) In the case of a pilot?s licence, act as a pilot of any aircraft flying in controlled airspace in circumstances requiring compliance with the Instrument Flight Rules or to give any instruction in flying.

Where a licence contains any extraordinary operational or medical limitations, individuals should contact PLD for advice.

http://www.caa.co.uk/default.aspx?categ ... &faqid=208


It is a fact that the U.S.A is an ICAO contracting state, therefore Article 21 of the ANO applies to the FAA licence.

Furthermore it is noteworthy in the context of this discussion that there are a number of individuals flying commercially for major carriers (EI aircraft) in Ireland using FAA ATPL's with a waiver from the IAA.

It is also interesting that a rather large polulation of EI registered aircraft exist all over the world due to the leasing arrangements in place through Irish finance companies. A percentage of these aircraft are operated in countries south of the Rio Grande by pilots holding a variety of non JAR licences.

Finally a colleague of mine was in Ireland 3 weeks ago and rented a single engine aircraft in Dublin to do some sightseeing with his girlfriend, he has never held a licence other than an FAA ticket. He experienced a hearty Irish welcome at the flight school !

You may have been advised otherwise, however the reality seems quite different.

All the best.
Celer fuga....

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Post by Lionel Hutz »

N714GZ

This has been done to death.

The definitive answer is that an FAA ticket is Valid here in Ireland Day VFR only on any aircraft other than an N-reg.
On an N-Reg aircraft in addition to Day VFR any additional ratings, night IFR etc are also valid in Ireland.

The IAA have decreed that (in Lionels view erroneously) that an FAA 3rd Class medical is not valid. This is no real restriction as an FAA 2nd Class medical is considered valid and is pretty much just as easy to get.

The relevant legislation places no geographic boundaries on flying EI reg aircraft under such circumstances, however there appears to be a body of opinion (one person) within the IAA who thinks that it applies only to the airspace of the state.

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Post by N714GZ »

Lionel,

Please point out where this has been "done to death"

On the rest of your post,
I stand corrected and thanks for the info.

4GZ

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Post by JFH »

q
Last edited by JFH on Mon Mar 11, 2013 8:14 pm, edited 1 time in total.

N714GZ
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Post by N714GZ »

The medical issue might have a lot to do with my confusion! Most of the guys I flew with in the States were on Class 3.

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Post by YoYo »

Toddy

Just to cloud the issue a little there is the 2 out of 3 rule which applies to most european countries but its mainly ignored. You must have 2 out of 3 of the following:

Country of licence
Country of A/c registration
Country flying in.

In other words under the rules I should not be flying an EI reg aircraft in the UK on a FAA PPL. But as I said it is not rigorously applied. The only time you might be caught out would be during a ramp check. If you are worried then apply to the CAA for a waiver.

Otherwise join the rest of the band and go out and enjoy yourself with the best license available - the FAA PPL & a class 2 medical

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Post by Lionel Hutz »

N714GZ

Most recently here

http://www.flyinginireland.com/forum/vi ... php?t=2003

but previously over a number of threads

Regards

Lionel

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Post by N714GZ »

More of a misunderstanding of the rule I think, endorsement of ICAO licences but with a medical acceptable by the local authority sorts out the confusion. Standing corrected. Any day you learn something new is a good day!
Lionel, a six post topic almost eight months ago hardy constitutes "done to death" even if there were some previous posts on the subject. On an aside, along with my IAA Class 1 I also have an FAA Class 3 medical for US flying and I think the IAA are spot on with this one. The standard is almost non existent.I have even heard the "doctor" prompting the applicant during the eye exam. I wouldn't trust an FAA Class 3 either.

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Post by Lionel Hutz »

GZ, where is the evidence to suggest that all those thousands of FAA Class 3 medicals flying around the world are having an unreasonable number of medically related accidents?

The UK have gone down this route with the medical requirements for the NPPL.

The JAA medical standards are Gold Plated for no discernable safety benefit.

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Post by N714GZ »

I haven't studied every NTSB incident report, nor I'd assume has anyone on this board. The evidence of having seen someone who obviously did not meet the fairly lenient eye sight requirements of an FAA Class 3 being prompted by the doctor in order to pass says it all. Don't trust an FAA Class3. Now introducing a properly regulated IAA/JAA Class 3, thats a wholly different issue. I would however only agree with it's use on an NPPL type system.

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Post by YoYo »

N714GZ

Medicals for VFR PPL's are only a money generating scheme for AME's. Next time you pay out your ?200 odd sum for your Class II medical ask the AME how long that guarantee's you health and safety. Answer while the ink is still wet on the paper.

Now look at countries that have brought in PPL sports licenses like the US and NPPL in the UK. You can fly on your car license medical. Thats even less strict than a Class 3. Because you heard of someone ebing prompted during a medical means nothing.

The best medical is not on a piece of paper. Its the question you should ask yourself every time you take command of an aircraft - Am I fit to fly today.

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