What are the requirements for getting an Instrument rating?
  • flying high
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    What are the requirements for getting an Instrument rating?

    by flying high » Thu Nov 24, 2005 7:53 pm

    Are their any benefits of doing so :?: :?:
  • on yer six
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    by on yer six » Thu Nov 24, 2005 8:06 pm

    In Ireland...probably not.

    Usually reserved for career pilots or aircraft owners. The latter can be a substanial reduction in insurance. Your Joe Average renter or even owner in this part of the world probably won't see much use. The weather here isn't realistic for pleasure flying IFR most days.
    On the other hand, will it make you a better pilot??? Of course, I think any training helps. It helps you see the big picture a lot more but then again read above.

    Oh... and about 10K.
  • Cosmic
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    by Cosmic » Thu Nov 24, 2005 10:37 pm

    And some ATPL exams 10 is it for a PPL IR?
    We who fly do so for the love of flying. We are alive in the air with this miracle that lies in our hands and beneath our feet.

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  • YoYo
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    by YoYo » Fri Nov 25, 2005 7:39 pm

    Last requirement but probably the most important - loads of money in your bank account that can, and will be, sucked out faster than water drains down a very big plughole
  • flying high
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    by flying high » Sat Nov 26, 2005 2:03 pm

    Thanks for the reply lads, where is the best FTO to do the rating :?: :idea: ?
  • on yer six
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    by on yer six » Sun Nov 27, 2005 2:37 pm

    Which country are you thinking of doing it in???
  • flying high
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    by flying high » Sun Nov 27, 2005 4:51 pm

    Ireland i was going to try the NFC.
  • on yer six
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    by on yer six » Mon Nov 28, 2005 10:49 am

    Where do you want to go with it. I mean is it for career flying or just personal use in a single or multi or what????
  • flying high
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    by flying high » Mon Nov 28, 2005 7:07 pm

    Personal use single IR only. :!: :!:
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    hum
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    PPLIR

    by hum » Tue Nov 29, 2005 12:46 pm

    Having an instrument rating and a suitably equipped aircraft means you have a proper mode of transport that can be relied on in most conditions rather than an occasional fair weather means of getting around by day only.

    If you intend to fly privately you should consider getting an FAA IR and flying IFR in 'N' registered aircraft.

    Acquiring and keeping an FAA IR is far more realistic for the private pilot that the JAA equivalent and looks to remain that way for the forseeable future.

    A few examples:

    The FAA IR groundschool can be done from Jeppsen CD or a text book. The FAA publish the bank of questions from which the exam will be taken. You go to a test centre, pay a small fee, they download a MCQ test from the internet, if you pass you get your result there and then, thats it - ground school over..... The JAA has the equivalent of a university degree program which must be done through a recognised training organisation.......

    Your FAA IR is valid for life as long as you keep it current, your JAA IR must be renewed annually by flight test where you book an examiner and supply an aircraft.

    You need a Class 1 medical for a JAA IR, if you are over 40 your JAA Class 1 medical lasts only 6 months. You need only a Class 2 medical cert for an FAA IR, that lasts 24 months if you are over 40, 36 months under 40.

    If you need reading glasses the JAA require an ophthalmological report every 2 years, done not just by any compenent ophthalmologist, but by one acceptable to the issuing Authority. (there are only 2 in Ireland, both in Dublin, and only 1 operates occasionally at the Mater Private Aeromedical Centre where you have to go for a Class 1 medical examination - the latter only operates 2 days a week.....) The FAA accept that reading glasses are a fact of life as one gets older and don't make a song and dance about it....

    I could go on!!

    Also, I recommend that if you are serious, you should join a pan-european organisation called PPLIR Europe, their website is at:

    www.pplir.org
  • on yer six
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    by on yer six » Tue Nov 29, 2005 2:44 pm

    ya, what Hum said. just to lazy to type all that out. Most of the groundschool you can learn yourself. If you knuckle down and do the FAA thing its probably works out a bit cheaper. That's good!!
    I did an FAA conversion and it costs alot, even a few hours so you have to weigh it out.
    FAA = good for N-reg
    JAA = good for most everything else you'll fly

    In the end flying isn't cheap, even cheap flying isn't cheap. I should have taken up snooker or something. Anyway good luck in your endevours!!!
  • alphaLaura
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    by alphaLaura » Tue Nov 29, 2005 4:59 pm

    on-yer-six - snooker ain't cheap either :D

    Thing about the IR is that, regardless of whether you get or maintain the actual rating, it's the experience, knowledge and training that counts.
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  • Pilot
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    by Pilot » Tue Nov 29, 2005 5:49 pm

    As I understand it, you don't need a class 1 medical for a JAA PPL/IR. You simply need a class 2 medical + an audiogram.

    However, having said that, because the exams for an IR in JAA land are just a subset of the ATPL exams, most people do the ATPL exams and take the CPL flight test while getting an IR, and therefore need a class 1 medical.

    But as long as you stick with just PPL/IR then a class 2 medial + audiogam is sufficient.

    P
  • flying high
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    by flying high » Tue Nov 29, 2005 5:54 pm

    thanks for your help lads. :!: where is the best place to do it in Ireland is it the NFC.
  • Lionel Hutz
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    by Lionel Hutz » Tue Nov 29, 2005 7:29 pm

    Unfortunately Flying High there is no best place in ireland to do an IR, that is for what you want it for. The regulations as they now stand are stacked against you in that you will find it very hard to keep your rating unless you are flying for a living.

    FAA Licences and ratings never expire or need to be renewed.

    It just becomes illegal to use them unless you jump through a few hoops every so often. You must undergo a flight review every 2 years. IFR currency is maintained by flying a number of approaches and doing holds etc within a certain period of time usually 6 months although there are exceptions to this.

    I have an FAA PPL and IFR rating.

    I am in current flying practice VFR only. My last IFR approach was more than 3 years ago, however my rating is still valid, I just can't use it. If I want to use it I have to complete an Instrument proficiency check with a suitably qualified FAA Instructor and get signed off by him. No correspondence with the FAA will be required and no fee will have to be paid to them.

    Contrast that with a JAR issued IR. If it lapses you will have to do and pass a flight test with an examiner and then submit paperwork to the IAA, pay a not insubstantial fee and sit on your arse waiting for them to issue it.

    There are other reasons to discourage you from trying to get the JAA rating. Irrelevant expensive exams. Forced attendance at an even more expensive ground school and inappropriate medical requirements that have no basis in safety.

    (An aside on the medical requirements, it is easier to pass a medical to fly as a mission specialist on the international space station than it is to pass a JAR Class 2 medical.)

    Recently The Department For transport in the UK engaged in a misguided attempt to force N reg planes based in the UK onto the G register. The overwhelming response that they got was that the main reason for so many planes based in the UK being on the N Register was because of the JAR IR.

    It is now firmly on the Agenda for change.

    http://www.iaopa-eur.org/wstore/content ... il=1001705

    My advice is to get an FAA rating. then when the JAA eventually get around to doing something reasonable about this situation you will be able to convert it to the equivalent JAA rating.

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