Clear for take off?

This is a forum where student pilots can post their questions for more experienced pilots to answer

Moderator: mark

Post Reply
Dermotjubjub
Unverified User
Unverified User
Posts: 2
Joined: Tue Jan 23, 2018 6:49 pm

Clear for take off?

Post by Dermotjubjub » Wed Jan 24, 2018 6:46 pm

Hi guys!
Am I glad to have found this forum!!!
I am about to start off my venture into the aviation industry, I intend to go all the way to ATPL, with the wife being Hungarian and there being a flight school in Szeged which is 30-35% the cost of doing it in Ireland that is the route I have chosen to take.
Now, my question, I will be 41 in April, is it too late for me to make a career from this at my age, and also, in your opinions, what would the airlines think of taking on a 43/44/45 year old man?

I am currently working 2 jobs to try fund this dream of mine and will be financially close to the bone for a number of years if I go down this path so i would be eternally greatful for some advice from some people in the industry.

Hope you are all keeping well
Regards and thanks in advance
Dermot

User avatar
mark
Site Admin
Site Admin
Posts: 1067
Joined: Fri Mar 05, 2004 7:56 pm
Location: Rathfarnham, Dublin
Contact:

Re: Clear for take off?

Post by mark » Thu Jan 25, 2018 11:29 am

Hi Dermot,

Welcome to the forum. To answer your question directly - no you are not too old. However, it will be much more difficult to complete the training and probably more difficult to get a job. There are a few studies I've read which show that learning ability drops off significantly from your early 30's onwards. It's definitely not impossible and I know plenty of people that have done a career change in their late 30's early 40's and have ended up with a very successful aviation career. It's just important to be aware that you will find the course a lot more demanding.

On the plus side, it has never been a better time to get a job. The job market is very buoyant at the moment. I've no idea how long it will last but with the amount of new aircraft on order and a reduction in the number of new pilots training (mainly due to cost) it looks likely to continue for some time yet.

My advice would be to first get a Class 1 medical to make sure there are no conditions that prohibit you flying commercially. My second piece of advice is to never pay up front for flight training. If you absolutely have to, make small regular payments so if the school does go out of business you limit your financial exposure.

If you have any more specific questions please feel free to ask.

Regards,
Mark
Regards,
Mark Dwyer
www.flyinginireland.com

------------------------------------------------
FlyingInIreland.com:- THE Resource for Irish Aviation Information

Dermotjubjub
Unverified User
Unverified User
Posts: 2
Joined: Tue Jan 23, 2018 6:49 pm

Re: Clear for take off?

Post by Dermotjubjub » Thu Jan 25, 2018 2:01 pm

Hi Mark,
Thanks for the informative reply, it has somewhat set my mind at ease. Another issue I would have is the hour building, I believe when you have your ATPL licence completed you’d have about 200 hours built up but would need considerably more before a company would take you on.

I certainly won’t have any cash spare after I get the licence so are there companies that take you on and help you to build up the hours or are you solely responsible for building up these hours yourself to 400/500? And you think there are airlines out there taking on 44/45 year olds??

Thanks again, much appreciated advice.
Dermot

User avatar
mark
Site Admin
Site Admin
Posts: 1067
Joined: Fri Mar 05, 2004 7:56 pm
Location: Rathfarnham, Dublin
Contact:

Re: Clear for take off?

Post by mark » Thu Jan 25, 2018 11:29 pm

Hi Dermot,

When you finish your training you will have a CPL with a Multi-Engine Instrument Rating. This is sometimes referred to as a Frozen ATPL (you can't get an ATPL until you have at least 1500 hours, among other things). It's not uncommon for airlines to take on pilots with this minimum amount of experience. I think I had about 220 hours when I got my first job. If you do an integrated course, this can be as low as 150 hours. Make sure you factor in the cost of an MCC course which is a requirement to get an airline job. Also UPRT training will be compulsory in the next 18 months which will be approximately 5 hours of extra training.

As for airlines taking on 44/45 year olds, I can't say. Perhaps someone else on here may have some personal experiences they could share?

Regards,
Mark
Regards,
Mark Dwyer
www.flyinginireland.com

------------------------------------------------
FlyingInIreland.com:- THE Resource for Irish Aviation Information

martins
Verified User
Verified User
Posts: 50
Joined: Wed Aug 13, 2014 3:24 pm

Re: Clear for take off?

Post by martins » Mon Feb 05, 2018 11:09 am

Hi Dermot,

Typically what we call hour building is that bit between your Private pilots license and Commercial pilots licence should you do a modular route. In other words a typical modular route should look like this:

First 50 or so hours - PPL,
Night Rating (5 hours)
Hour Building (100 hours or so) (in the mean time you study ATPL theory)

the minimum experience you need to have before starting a CPL/ME/IR course is 100 hours as Pilot in command and 150 hours total time. However to sit a CPL skills test you will need 200 hours. (only 5 can be credited from a simulator), that typically means if you walk in to your CPL course with the bare minimum of 150 hours, you will not have enough as most schools will finish CPL/ME/IR training in just 40 hours or less.. My advice - find out the requirements of the school you will choose and make sure you have enough hours before starting the course.

That's to describe a modular path.. Integrated is a bit different

after CPL/ME/IR you do your MCC and start sending your CVs

as for the age - one of my friends is starting his Type Rating with Turkish Airlines shortly at the age of 41. He is part Turkish so that might have helped him a bit. 40-ish is not too old, but I would suggest it's the last point at which you can jump in the train.

One last bit I want to mention - there are some Eastern European schools out there that appear cheap simply because they only include Single Engine instrument rating in their package. Some are even being naughty and try to conceal this fact by throwing a MEP rating in the mix to confuse you. Make sure the rating you will end up getting is indeed a multi engine instrument rating, as this is what you will need to begin a type rating on a multi engine aircraft. Some people have been burned on this - they sign up, start the training and as they go they are told that the original price they were quoted for is for SE-IR only, and to get a ME-IR the price you are then facing is the same as in Ireland/UK

Post Reply

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest