Flying in Ireland meet up Sunday 1st March EIAB airfield

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Hoss
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PPR

Post by Hoss » Sun Mar 08, 2009 9:57 pm

'One mistake I think on the main organiser was not to contact the airfield operators for what was a sizeable amount of aircraft, but these things happen'

As Abbeyshrule is like most a PPR airfield, surely all the aircraft that attended had prior permission to land at the field? :?:

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Post by cleared to land » Mon Mar 09, 2009 7:39 pm

Hay all, I am based in EIWT myself... as I could not make EIAB what does everyone think about having an FII flyin in EIBR or EIKK??? :roll:

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Post by Flyer1 » Mon Mar 09, 2009 8:03 pm

I think the above suggestion is a sensible one, we'll hopefully be able to tie it in with the Kilkenny Fly-in during May.

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Post by cleared to land » Mon Mar 09, 2009 9:26 pm

what date is the flyin.

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Post by Papa8 » Mon Mar 09, 2009 9:53 pm

Kilkenny fly-in is set pretty much in the main for the 23rd of May. The fly-in is geared to be an all airfield affair and it may be promoted as Conor Airpark fly-in or Kilkenny Airfield fly-in.

The field has had sand put down large tine-sized holes and drainage in the form of gravel is also expected to be laid under the bottom end of the field to further improve drainage there. However the field is still soft at the moment and very little flying is possible at the moment due to the risk of leaving scrape marks in the runway.

Anyone with solutions cheaper than an all-tarmac runway to get to year-round operations? (cool quarter of a million probably to put down 600m x 18m and apparently plastic gridding a similar section could be equally costly. I understand that unlicensed fields might get away with putting down gravel and letting grass grow over but that is not a solution in our case. PM me if anyone knows of effective alternatives.
It only takes two things to fly:--- airspeed and money.

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Post by Nanolight » Tue Mar 10, 2009 8:32 pm

Parallell Runway? Or even an X/wind one? There's plenty of room there and all you'd have to do is mow the grass and roll it a bit.

You could dig up and drain one rwy while using the other, and alternate them in poorer conditions to allow them time to recover?

Just a suggestion.
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Post by Papa8 » Tue Mar 10, 2009 9:27 pm

Licensing an alternative parallel or xwind runway temporarily - don't know all the ins and outs but the licensed aerodrome manual is a bit of a behemoth on these things (all training flights must be from licensed airfields). When the grass grows in the summer the roots will open up drainage and the sand will disperse further down but for now the runway is squidgy underfoot clearly demonstrating the water is sitting just under the surface.
It only takes two things to fly:--- airspeed and money.

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Post by cubpilot » Wed Mar 11, 2009 9:40 am

Worms! I used to fly from a field which stayed quite dry in winter because the owner used to keep a high density of sheep on it. the theory was that the sheep promoted worms and in sufficient density these helped drainage. Sheep also cut down on mowing bills if stocked densly.
i have also read recently that the more varieties of grass grown some with deep roots and others with surface spreading roots so the total effect is to form a dense mat that can withstand more load than the usual grass field.

After a short time the flock got used to planes and we would not bother to herd them off, just do a low pass and then land with sheep standing to one side of the strip. not sure if they went baa baa baa in time with a bouncy landing.
Downside of sheep is the regular plane washing and guess where the strip was, that's right Sheepwash in Devon. ( headcorn also used to have a resident flock but these were rounded up before opening time)

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Post by j3cub » Wed Mar 11, 2009 9:58 am

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Post by cubpilot » Wed Mar 11, 2009 2:33 pm

J3, yep strip is sized for twin com ops. no landing fees but very strict PPR, failure to phone will see you booted off in short time by owner.
However the field that had the sheep is no longer a strip but it did have 3 runways the longest was 350m. it was close to village and for one approach you had to avoid church tower.
hope you enjoyed the visit to eggesford, best strip in the south of uk for friendliness and as you say no-one chasing you for a landing fee.

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Post by j3cub » Wed Mar 11, 2009 2:53 pm

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Post by jonkil » Wed Mar 11, 2009 6:59 pm

Eggesford is one of the nicest strips in the UK..period.
The owner is a real gentleman and I would say he possesses the greatest knowledge of auster aircraft anywhere in the world. He knows each and every one, their different marks and the history of them.... hangars full of absolutely beautiful aircraft... a real pleasure of an airfield to visit.... will be on our list this year for sure again.

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Post by cubpilot » Wed Mar 11, 2009 10:00 pm

the strip just inland from hartland is Gorrel farm, owned by an ex FAA bucaneer pilot. 400yard up hill with a soggy bottom in winter. he keeps a cub and is rebuilding a fairchild argus. again ppr so sheep can be cleared off and the kettle put on the hob.
shuld you fancy it he has a holiday cottage on the site. don't know the terms and conditions but it sleeps 4 and is immaculate.
landing there requires a bit of skill due to the slope. i do a curved approach to avoid overflying fishermen on a lake at the end of the strip and to get into the valley bottom.

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